The top stories, the best sites.
             feeds for your website / blog
Poll: What's the future for Trump and the U.S.?
articles

content feeds for your site



amusingplanet.com      in your list

Amusing Planet - Amazing Places, Wonderful People, Weird Stuff



The Basement Shops of Sofia  

Street vendors are a common sight in cities across the world. The inability to pay high rent, or the unavailability of cheap commercial space, have pushed these small merchants on to streets, and in some cases, on to basements, as in the Bulgarian capital of Sofia. Known as klek shops, these basement shops are unique to the city of Sofia. The shops are set in the basement of the buildings containing a small window that opens in the sidewalk, usually below the knee level. This is why they are kn

2017-03-27 15:04:00
`
0 

Vilarinho da Furna: A Drowned Roman Village  

Vilarinho da Furna, in the municipality of Terras de Bouro in the Braga district, in northern Portugal, was an old village that was erased from the map in 1972 by the construction of a nearby dam. A reservoir up on the River Homem was filled and Vilarinho da Furna went down underwater, but not for eternity. Once in a while, when the water level of the reservoir falls below a certain level, the ghostly buildings of a once flourishing village emerges. Vilarinho da Furna's death was sudden, but t...

2017-03-27 15:03:00
`
2 

The Temple of The Flying Monks  

That tiny orange figure levitating above this futuristic structure high on the Songshan mountain in rural Henan, China, is indeed a monk, although he is not flying by the sheer power of meditation. There is a giant fan beneath him, hidden in the interior of the structure. This is a vertical wind tunnel, the kind where skydiving is practiced. Designed by Latvian architecture studio Mailītis Architects, the recently completed Shaolin Flying Monks Temple is actually a 230-seat amphitheater where S...

2017-03-23 11:29:00
`
0 

The Wild Burros of Oatman, Arizona  

Positioned in the ancient part of old Route 66, in the US state of Arizona, Oatman is full of wild burros —an old Spanish term which means donkeys— roaming the streets. This town with an old western appearance has been an enjoyable place and a tourist attraction for the burros wandering around with springiness. The wild donkeys can be hand-fed with 'burro chow', naturally known as hay cubes, which are readily available in the town. Although they gently behave with tourists, still you wil...

2017-03-23 11:08:00
`
8 

Moroccan Wall: The Longest Minefield in The World  

You may or you may not have heard about "Western Sahara", but if you consult Google Maps or any other modern atlas, you will notice this region clearly identified in the southern end of Morocco. "Western Sahara" is not an actual country, as indicated by the lack of a political boundary between this region and Morocco, but it isn't totally under the control of Morocco either. It is a disputed region with a complex, war-torn history, and like many other disputed regions in the world, it ...

2017-03-21 13:07:00
`
1 

The Japanese Soldiers Who Wouldn't Surrender  

Emperor Hirohito's announcement of Japan's surrender at the end of the Second Word War came as a blessed relief to millions of Japanese who had suffered during the long hostilities, but not everybody was prepared to lay down their arms. Japanese soldiers had been indoctrinated to fight onto death, refuse surrender and sacrifice themselves instead of being taken as prisoners. So when the shocking announcement came through the mouth of the Emperor on 15 August 1945, hundreds of soldiers went i...

2017-03-19 10:51:00
`
0 

Agloe: A Fake Town That Became Real  

In the 1930s, a small town named Agloe suddenly began appearing on the maps of New York. It was positioned near an unmarked dirt road that led from Roscoe to Rockland, and near to Beaverkill. That road was neither visited by anyone nor was it popularly known, and very few people, if any, outside of the mapmakers' company, knew that the town of Agloe didn't even exist. Agloe was a copyright trap—a century old trick mapmakers and dictionary makers have been using to catch copycats. When comp...

2017-03-19 10:49:00
`
7 

The Battle for Castle Itter: The Strangest Battle of WW2  

In the waning days of the Second World War, five days after Hitler shot himself in his bunker in Berlin, one of the most bizarre battle took place at a 19th century castle in the Austrian Alps. Castle Schloss Itter, located on a hill close to the village Itter, had some very prominent French personalities held prisoners by the SS. After the prison's guards fled, the hardy prisoners took arms and fought side-by-side along with American and German troops against the Nazis. The Battle of Castle

2017-03-11 12:44:00
`
0 

Thilafushi: Maldives's Garbage Island  

What does an island with not a speck of land to spare do to get rid of hundreds of tons of garbage generated each day by its one million yearly tourists and nearly four hundred thousand permanent residents? They dump it into another island, of course. The stunning tropical islands of Maldives, southwest of India, is known for its sandy beaches and turquoise waters. But very few are aware of its dirty side. Just a few miles west of Male, the capital city of Maldives, and one of the most densely

2017-03-10 12:13:00
`
17 

The Mysterious Caynton Caves  

What appears to be an ordinary rabbit hole in a farmer's field is actually the humble entrance to a large underground cave whose origins are shrouded in mystery. Located in the grounds of Caynton Hall, near Beckbury, in Shropshire, England, the Caynton Caves were believed to have been dug in the late 18th or early 19th Century, but popular legend associate them with the Knights Templar, a Catholic military order that was founded in the 12th Century, originally to guard pilgrims on their way

2017-03-09 12:52:00
`
8 

Monument to The Armenian Alphabet  

Located near the village of Artashavan, close to the highway, in Armenia, stands 39 giant carved Armenian letters dedicated to the language its speakers take pride in. The Armenian alphabet is more than 1,600 years old and it's still used today in its original form. It was devised by Saint Mesrop Mashtots, an Armenian linguist and ecclesiastical leader, in 405 CE in order to make the Bible accessible to Armenians and spread Christianity. Prior to that, Armenians had no alphabet of their own an...

2017-03-09 10:30:00
`
25 

This Croatian Island Looks Like A Giant Fingerprint  

This tiny island in the Adriatic Sea, off the coast of Croatia, has been under a lot of attention in recent times. Located in the Sibenik archipelago on the Dalmatian coast, this small island of 1.4 square kilometer is completely covered by a web of dry stone walls. When viewed from the air, the oval-shaped island of Baljenac, (also spelled Bavljenac), looks like a giant fingerprint with long lines of low walls resembling ridges and grooves of the skin. Like many west European nations such as Ir

2017-03-07 20:20:00
`
18 

Chaiten: The Town Buried By A Volcano  

Early in the morning of May 2, 2008, a volcano located about 10 km to the north of the town of Chaiten, near the Gulf of Corcovado in southern Chile, rumbled to life after nearly 10,000 years of inactivity. The plume of volcanic ash rose to 17 km and blanketed the entire town. At that time about 4,000 people were living in Chaiten, who were immediately evacuated. The Chaiten volcano continued to erupt for the next several days becoming increasingly violent. The ash column became 30 km tall and...

2017-03-07 10:22:00
`
17 

Bridegroom's Oak: The Tree With Its Own Postal Address  

Bräutigamseiche, Dodauer Forst, 23701 Eutin, Germany If you write a letter addressed to the address above, it will end up in knothole of an oak tree in the Dodauer Forst forest near Eutin in Germany. In the past hundred years, thousands of people have written to this tree, and reportedly hundreds have had their wishes fulfilled— the wish of finding one's love partner. Photo credit: Holger.Ellgaard/Wikimedia Read more » © Amusing Planet, 2017.

2017-03-06 20:24:00
`
20 

The Deepest Metro Stations in The World  

The average metro train doesn't go beyond a few stories underground. But sometimes the geology and the geography of the region, such as the presence of rivers and swamps, forces engineers to go deep underground. The Arsenalna, a station on Kiev Metro's Sviatoshynsko-Brovarska Line, is such an exception. Arsenalna station is located 105.5 meters below the surface, making it the deepest metro station in the world. If you made a vertical shaft on earth as deep, you could drop the entire Statu...

2017-03-04 12:45:00
`
12 

The Witty Epitaphs of Key West Cemetery  

A cemetery might seem like an odd destination on a tourist circuit, but the one in Key West, Florida, has a lot of history and some rather interesting tombs. This 19-acre graveyard was founded in 1847 after a terrible hurricane in October 1846 washed away the old cemetery that was located near the coast. After this, the new cemetery was built on the highest point in Key West, and the old graves that survived the hurricane were moved here. Because of the high water table, most of the graves lie a

2017-03-02 22:04:00
`
21 

The Museum of Broken Relationships  

An empty bottle of whiskey, a pair of fake breasts, a pair of tattered blue jeans, a toaster, an axe, and a stack of Brazilian Playboy magazines. These are some of the artifacts displayed at the Museum of Broken Relationships, a project that collects and displays the wreckage of failed romantic exploits. The museum has two locations—the original at Zagreb, Croatia, and a second establishment opened in Los Angeles, the US, about a year ago. The Museum was the brainchild of Olinka Vistica and Dr...

2017-03-02 14:54:00
`
35 

The Ruins of Suakin Island  

The island town of Suakin, in north-eastern Sudan, was an important port for trade and culture on the East African coast for centuries. The town is located on a flat, oval-shaped island, on the west coast of the Red Sea, inside a narrow inlet that penetrates four kilometer inland and ends in a wide basin about two kilometers across. There are two round coral islands in the shallow basin. One of the islands is deserted and contains nothing but a cemetery. The other island to the south is the site

2017-03-01 21:26:00
`
47 

Grime's Graves: A Neolithic Flint Mine  

maThis strange lunar-like landscape in the middle of Thetford Forest in Norfolk, England, looks very similar to mortar craters in Normandy and in Somme from the First World War. But these ones in Norfolk have a different origin, and despite their name, they are not graves. Grime's Graves is actually a large flint mining complex from the Neolithic age that's at least 4,500 years old. In the Neolithic era, flint —a hard, mineralized form of quartz—was a valuable natural resource and high...

2017-02-28 16:40:00
`
39 

The Fortress of Mimoyecques  

About twenty kilometers from the city of Boulogne-sur-Mer, near the hamlet of Mimoyecques, in northern France, lies a once-secret underground Nazi base. Dug out under the limestone hills, the sprawling complex consisted of a network of tunnels linked to five inclined shafts in which Hitler planned to install more than two dozen superguns, called the V-3, all targeted towards London, 165 km away. The base was never completed, and its purpose of attacking London never realized. Had it been success

2017-02-28 10:41:00
`
34 

The Colorful Mansions of El Alto  

Spread out across the Bolivian highlands, at 4,000 meters, the city of El Alto is predominantly ochre-red, with thousands of low, matchbox-like brick houses with unfinished and unpainted facades lining the sides of dusty, unpaved roads. It's so drab and monotonous and depressing that residents have started to liven things up by adding splashes of color wherever they could. They have also started to design their houses into bizarre shapes. Spearheading this new architectural revolution is self-...

2017-02-27 14:43:00
`
39 

Isa lake: The Two-Ocean Lake  

The Isa Lake Viewpoint, located about 8 miles east of the Old Faithful Area along the Grand Loop Road in Yellowstone National Park, is not a terribly exciting place. On the way to the Old Faithful geyser, you can alight from your vehicle and stand on the edge of a thin sliver of water filled with waterlilies and fallen logs. By the side of the lake is a Continental Divide elevation sign, and an interpretive sign describing the significance of the Continental Divide and Isa Lake. 'Continental ...

2017-02-24 21:41:00
`
24 

Project Habakkuk: Britain's Secret Ship Made of Ice  

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and no time in history was as desperate as the time when the world's most powerful nations were determined in destroying each other. It was time of the Second World War, and the allies were running out of essential resources needed to construct military and naval equipment. One of them was steel. In the North Atlantic, the British fleets were taking a pounding against the German U-boats. Allied supply ships on their way across the ocean were being i...

2017-02-23 21:59:00
`
34 

Pioneertown: A Movie Set That Became A Real Town  

In 1946, a bunch of Hollywood legends including Roy Rogers, Dick Curtis, and Russell Hayden —tired of travelling to far-off locations to shoot western movies, that were very popular at the time— decided to build a Wild West set, in the High Desert of Southern California, where directors could shoot movies and the crew could live. They drove out to a spot 4 miles to the northwest of Yucca Valley, and two hours from Los Angeles, and started building facades and spaces to resemble a 19th-centur...

2017-02-23 12:49:00
`
40 

The Mysterious Gotland Grooves  

Scattered throughout the island of Gotland, in the middle of the Baltic Sea, are thousands of stones with strange grooves or furrows cut into its smooth, hard surface. The grooves always occur in groups, cut side by side and are of varying length, width and depth. At first glance, it appears as if someone had been sharpening their axes or swords on them. That was the general opinion when the grooves were widely reported in the mid-19th century. Consequently, the grooves were called "sharpe

2017-02-22 15:55:00
`
28 

The Crypt of Civilization  

Under the foundation of Phoebe Hearst Memorial Hall at Oglethorpe University in Georgia, the United States, is a large room, that was sealed shut with a welded stainless steel door more than seventy five years ago. A plaque on this door strictly forbids anyone from attempting to open the door for another six thousand years. Behind this steel door is an assortment of artifacts and documents comprising nearly all of humanity's knowledge, as it was in 1940. This room is the Crypt of Civilizatio

2017-02-21 16:00:00
`
22 

Postman's Park's Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice  

Tucked away in a quiet corner of Postman's Park in central London, easily overlooked, lies a remarkable memorial. Under a wooden canopy, stands a short stretch of brick wall upon which are affixed over fifty ceramic plaques, each bearing the name of an ordinary person who performed a final, extraordinary act of bravery and self-sacrifice in their life. Some plaques bear two or more names. Altogether some sixty-two people are commemorated here. All of them died while trying to save the lives

2017-02-20 21:41:00
`
46 

Sarajevo Tunnel: The Tunnel of Hope  

Five meters below the runway of Sarajevo's airport runs a short stretch of tunnel that was dug out during the Siege of Sarajevo to bring supplies to the cut-off city. For four years this 800-meter long tunnel was the besieged city's only connection to the outside world, and its life support. In the spring of 1992, when Serbian forces encircled the city of Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and began bombarding it with artillery and sniper fire, some three hundred thousand cit...

2017-02-20 11:53:00
`
50 

Elgin Marbles: A Piece of The Parthenon in London  

Should a museum keep artistic treasures it acquired under dubious circumstances a long time ago, or should it return them to their country of origin? This is the debate surrounding the so-called Elgin Marbles. Currently at the British Museum of London, the Elgin Marbles are some of the finest sculptures of classical Greece, originally sculpted for Athens's greatest monument, the Parthenon. Built nearly 2,500 years ago, the Parthenon was originally a temple dedicated to the Greek goddess Athe

2017-02-19 12:11:00
`
41 

A Blast From The Past: Episode 33  

From the archives of Amusing Planet. Tristan da Cunha - The Most Remote Island in the World Tristan da Cunha is a volcanic island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean lying 2,816 kilometers from the nearest land, South Africa, and 3,360 kilometers from South America. 'Edinburgh of the Seven Seas', the main settlement of the island, is regarded as the most remote permanent settlement in the world, being over 2,400 kilometers from the nearest human settlement, on Saint Helena. Read more » &...

2017-02-17 15:10:00
`
34 

Floating Houses of Lake Bokodi  

Lake Bokodi, in the village of Bokod, about 80 kilometers west of Budapest, Hungary, is an artificial lake created in 1961 by the Oroszlany Thermal Power Company by flooding a low-lying meadow next to the plant. The power plant draws cold water from the lake to operate its boilers, and warm water is returned back to the lake. This continues recycling of the water causes the lake to never freeze even in the chilly winter air. Over the years, the lake became a popular spot for fishing and anglin...

2017-02-16 22:05:00
`
49 

The Romantic Tale Of The Chicken Farmer Rock  

Verona might be the birthplace of the most famous love story in literature, but the small village of Newbury, in the state of New Hampshire, the United States, is home to the most enduring one of recent times. Although very few have heard of the story of the chicken farmer, it is New Hampshire's favorite legend. The story begins about thirty years ago. At that time, there was a small white house by the side of Route 103, that passes through Newbury, with a chicken farm in the backyard. And on ...

2017-02-16 19:48:00
`
50 

The Mystery of Carolina Bays  

In the 1930s, when the Atlantic coast was being photographed from airplanes for the first time in history, a curious geological feature came to light. The coast stretching from southern New Jersey to northern Florida was littered with thousands of strange elliptical depressions like craters on the Moon. These depressions are now collectively called Carolina Bays, but they are also known by different names. In Maryland, they are called Maryland Basins, and within the Delmarva Peninsula, they are

2017-02-15 11:38:00
`
55 

The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou  

The town of Ait-Ben-Haddou, located on the southern slopes of the High Atlas Mountains, is one of the most spectacular manmade sights along the valley in Morocco's rocky desert. The town is best known for its kasbas —the tall earthen buildings that crowd together behind defensive walls, reinforced by corner towers. Such a town is known as a ksar, or a fortified town, and Ait-Ben-Haddou is said to be one of the best examples of a ksar with South Moroccan architecture. The town's dramatic s...

2017-02-14 16:12:00
`
52 

The Russian Gangster Cemetery in Yekaterinburg  

The Shirokorechenskoe Cemetery, located on the southwestern outskirts of Yekaterinburg, in Russia, is the final resting place of many famous locals including folk artists, scientists, and heroes of World War 2. Their graves are adorned with unusual funerary sculptures, including reliefs, gem-embedded headstones and laser engravings of the deceased on granite. In one section of the cemetery, among the pines, you'll find some of the most elaborate tombstones. Huge granite headstones with large-t...

2017-02-13 20:19:00
`
54 

The Waffle Rock  

Just outside the visitor center of Jennings Randolph Lake, in Mineral County, in the US state of West Virginia, is a large piece of rock on display. On one side of the rock there appears a regular waffle-like geometric pattern of raised, darker stone that runs in almost perfectly straight lines across the rock's surface. The lines cross themselves at various angles forming deep pockets of lighter colored material. The strange patterning on the so-called Waffle Rock is a result of natural erosi...

2017-02-13 16:14:00
`
56 

Point Nemo: The Spacecraft Cemetery  

Far off the east coast of New Zealand, about 3,300 kilometers out in the Pacific Ocean, lies one of the geekiest junkyard in the world. It's located in the middle of nowhere, and there is certainly no island here —just water. But four kilometers beneath the waves, the ocean floor is littered with broken fragments and debris of old satellites, space stations and spacecraft. This is the "Spacecraft Cemetery", where space agencies around the world send their decommissioned satellites and sp...

2017-02-10 17:24:00
`
48 

The Grave With A Window  

There is a curious grave at Evergreen Cemetery in the West River neighborhood of New Haven, Connecticut, the United States. It's a small grassy mound with a large slab of granite placed at the top. This granite block has a small fourteen inch square glass window facing towards the sky. The glass window is hazy and has beads of water hanging on the underside from condensation, and you can't see much inside. But back in 1893, you could have peered inside and straight into the decomposing face ...

2017-02-09 14:59:00
`
52 

Lung Fish, The Fish That Lives On Land  

The lungfish, also known as salamanderfish, is a type of freshwater fish best known for its ability to live on land, without water, for months on end, and sometimes even years. As its name suggest, the lungfish have a highly evolved respiratory system that can take oxygen straight from the air, just like land animals do. In fact, some species of lungfish are so used to breathing air that they slowly lose the function of their gills as the fish approach adulthood. While they still live in water,

2017-02-09 10:41:00
`
48 

Verkhoyansk: Siberia's Pole of Cold  

In the remote Yakutia region of Siberia, more than a hundred kilometers inside the Arctic Circle, lies the small town of Verkhoyansk. Winter temperature here regularly drops to minus fifty degree Celsius. It's so cold that "no one can stay outside for more than 15 minutes". The only way to protect oneself from the bitter cold is to wrap themselves up in skins and furs of animals, and keep moving. Verkhoyansk was founded by the Cossacks back in 1638. Its location on the upper reaches of th...

2017-02-08 15:16:00
`
47 

The Hermits of Karoulia of Mount Athos  

Mount Athos, located on a Greek peninsula in the Aegean Sea, is home to one of the oldest surviving monastic community on Earth. The mountain has been inhabited since ancient times and is known for its nearly 1,800-year continuous Christian presence and its long historical monastic traditions, which date back to at least the 9th century. Today, there are twenty Eastern Orthodox monasteries in this region, where over two thousand monks live an ascetic life, isolated from the rest of the world. M

2017-02-07 21:35:00
`
34 

The Bear Moat of Český Krumlov Castle  

The historic Český Krumlov Castle in the small city of Český Krumlov, in the Czech Republic, was built in the mid-13th century by the powerful Rosenberg family, who played an important role in the medieval history of the country. Members of this family held positions at the Prague royal, and later the imperial court, and were viewed as powerful lords of the Kingdom of Bohemia. The Krumlov Castle is unusually large for a town of Krumlov's size. It is the second largest castle in the Czec...

2017-02-07 15:52:00
`
55 

The Sundial Cannon of Åtvidaberg  

In the not-too-distant past, before the invention of modern timekeeping devices, noontime —the moment when the sun is at the highest position in the sky— held special significance. Unlike other cues like the rising and setting of the sun, or the moon, or the stars, whose time changes from day to day throughout the year, the elapsed time from noon of one day to the noon of the next is almost exactly 24 hours, irrespective of the time of the year. In reality, it varies by a few seconds up to h...

2017-02-06 21:17:00
`
44 

Santa Cruz Del Islote: A Crowded Utopia  

Santa Cruz del Islote is a tiny coral island, and one of the smallest, in the archipelago of San Bernardo off the coast of Colombia. It is only 2.4 acre in size, yet, it's home to 1,200 people. That's a population density four times that of Manhattan. But Santa Cruz del Islote is no Manhattan. There is no running water or sewage system. Electricity runs for just five hours a day from a generator, and fresh water is dropped off by the Colombian navy once every three weeks. So why do people l...

2017-02-03 21:04:00
`
62 

Alert: The Most Northern Settlement in The World  

Located just over eight hundred kilometers away from the North Pole, the community of Alert, on the northeastern tip of Ellesmere Island, in Nunavut, Canada, is the most northerly permanent settlement in the world. The nearest populated place is another 540 kilometers south, in Greenland, while the nearest Canadian city is over two thousand kilometers away. The place is so close to the North Pole that it can't connect with communication satellites because their orbit lies below the horizon. Fo...

2017-02-03 17:08:00
`
64 

A Spotlight Of Snow  

The other day, NASA's Earth Observatory posted some interesting pictures about localized snow in the Netherlands. Several fields in Heensche Molen, a hamlet in the western Netherlands, glowed white as though a spotlight had been shone over them, leaving nearby areas untouched. According to their interpretation, the snowfall was caused by a drop in temperature that led to the condensation of the tiny droplets of water in the fog over these areas into ice crystals, which fell as snowflakes. As P...

2017-02-02 21:26:00
`
58 

Glass Beach on Ussuri Bay  

Just a 30-minute-drive away from the city of Vladivostok, Russia, lies a stunning bay surrounded by impressive cliffs. Not very long ago, the beach here was used as dumping ground of unwanted glass by a local porcelain factory, or so the story goes. According to another version, the waste glass products were washed away by the river and then swept into the sea. Now years later, the seaside on Ussuri Bay as taken on an unusual appearance. Millions of broken bits of glass, rounded smooth by the re

2017-02-02 16:23:00
`
91 

The Sunken Lanes of Europe  

Appearing as trenches dredged through the earth or tunnels cleared through forests, these ancient pathways called holloways or sunken lanes are found all across the European countryside. They originally began at the ground level, but over the centuries, under the tread of a million feet and hooves encompassing thousands of journeys, the floor of these roads have worn away and eroded down to the bedrock, creating ditches that lay beneath the level of the surrounding landscape. With high banks on

2017-02-01 22:03:00
`
102 

Checkerboard Forest  

If you pull up Google Maps and look at the forested areas of Western United States, you'll notice strange checkerboard patterns, like the one below. A digitally enhanced screengrab from Google Maps. Coordinates: 48.4170389,-116.8918616 These patterns are the result of an agreement made in the mid-1800s, where the US government granted public domain lands to a company called the Oregon and California Railroad to build a rail link between Portland and California. Like most railroad grant lands ...

2017-01-31 20:11:00
`
74 

The Oil Rig Graveyard of Cromarty Firth  

In a remote sheltered harbor guarded by two precipitous headlands, in the North of Scotland, dozens of oil rigs are sitting idle, some for more than a decade, quietly waiting for offshore oil drilling to become profitable again. The Cromarty Firth Port Authority (CFPA) was established in 1972 as a dry dock for repair and fabrication of oil platforms operating in the North Sea. This region, which includes the shallow waters of the U.K., Norway, Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands, is one of the

2017-01-31 15:21:00
`
83 

The Lost Island of Ferdinandea  

Once upon a time, in the waters not far off the coast of Sicily, there was an island called Ferdinandea. It was located right where the Mediterranean Sea narrowed between Sicily and Tunisia —a strategic position for any naval power who wished to control traffic in the Mediterranean. A tug-o-war for sovereignty, between four powerful nations, began as soon as the island was discovered, but it didn't last long. Less than six months later, the island had sunk back into the sea. Now almost two h...

2017-01-30 15:56:00
`
68 

Batagaika Crater, Siberia  

In the heart of Siberia's boreal forest, a massive crater the locals call the "gateway to the underworld" has been growing for the last fifty years. It appears in the form of a huge gash on earth, a kilometer long and one hundred meters deep at one end.  Named after the nearby flowing Batagayka river, a tributary of the river Yana, the Batagaika crater is what geologists call a thermokarst depression —cave-ins which results when the permafrost melts, and although the Batagaika crater ha...

2017-01-29 11:03:00
`
79 

A Blast From The Past: Episode 32  

From the archives of Amusing Planet. Parting of the Sea in Jindo The Jindo county is an archipelago of 250 islands, of which Jindo Island is the third largest in Korea. Every year at the end of February and again in mid-June, extremely low tide causes a natural land pass 2.9 km long and 10-40 meters wide to appear connecting the main Jindo island and a small Modo island to the south of Jindo. The pass stays for about an hour before being submerged again. The event is celebrated by a local fest...

2017-01-28 16:44:00
`
128 

The World's Smallest Mountain And Mountain Range  

That little bump ahead, just beyond the fork in the road, is the world's smallest registered mountain. Located in Australia's low-lying Terrick Terrick Range, Mount Wycheproof stands 148 meters above sea level, which is pretty decent for a small mountain. However, it rises only 43 meters above the surrounding plain, and because the ground rises gradually to the summit, it's hard to say where the mountain begins. The mountain is located on the town of Wycheproof, which in turn is located on...

2017-01-27 21:10:00
`
88 

The Zion Curtains of Utah  

A source of confusion among many first time visitors to the US state of Utah are the bars. Like any regular bar, there are stools lining the shiny counter, but instead of facing the bottles and the bartender, they look straight at a wall of clouded white glass that rises from the middle of the counter, obscuring both the bottles and bartenders on the other side. These barriers are nicknamed Zion curtains, a dig at the Church of Mormons that hold a large influence over the population of Utah. In

2017-01-27 12:54:00
`
125 

The Chemical Valley of Sarnia  

These tall chimneys billowing thick, toxic smoke stand on the banks of the Saint Clair River, on the outskirts of the Canadian city of Sarnia, in Southwestern Ontario. Stretching for over 30 kilometers along the riverbank from the southern tip of Lake Huron to the village of Sombra, this region has been nicknamed the Chemical Valley, because of the large concentration of petroleum and chemical factories that are packed together here, elbow-to-elbow, within an area the size of a hundred city bloc

2017-01-25 23:18:00
`
83 

The Floating Bridges of Seattle  

A bridge of concrete and steel that floats may seem highly unusual, if not impossible, but there are twenty such bridges around the world, five in the U.S. state of Washington alone, of which four are the longest floating bridges in the world. Floating bridges, also known as pontoon bridges, are usually temporary structures built out of wood during times of emergencies such as war. Wooden floats and sometimes boats are lashed together and flat planks are laid over creating a roadway, allowing m

2017-01-25 16:59:00
`
85 

Playgrounds From The Space Age  

The rocket holds a special place in history. It's an icon of technological progress that's both revered and feared at the same time. During the sixties of the last century, the United States and the Soviet Union was gripped by the space-age fever, and the rocket emerged as the fundamental symbol of the space rivalry. Throughout America, as well as the Eastern bloc, rocket shaped structures began popping up across children playgrounds to foster curiosity and excitement about the space race am...

2017-01-24 22:18:00
`
98 

The Execution Dock on River Thames  

Travellers to early modern London, while approaching the port city up the river Thames, were greeted by a ghastly sight. The riverbank was lined with gallows, from which hung a number of rotting corpses, bound in iron cages. They swung in the wind and made a horrid creaking noise that both terrified and offended wayfarers. But the gallows at London's infamous Execution Dock would remain for nearly four hundred years. This was a time when Britain was expanding its empire. The British crown, dri...

2017-01-23 20:55:00
`
98 

The House Where Hitler Was Born  

Braunau am Inn, on the south bank of the Inn river, close to the border with Germany, is a charming little town in Austria. But it carries a dark legacy. Not far from the main square is the street Salzburger Vorstadt, where stands a nondescript three-story, beige-colored brick building, bearing house number 15. It's the house where Adolf Hitler was born. The leader of the Nazi party was born here on 20 April 1889. At that time, the building was a modest guest house where Hitler's father, Al...

2017-01-23 12:33:00
`
108 

The Terrifying Beauty of Melting Icecaps  

Every summer, as the air warms up and the sunlight beats down on the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, pools of brilliantly blue melt water are formed across the pristine white landscape. While summer time melting is normal, over the past several decades, the rate of melting has been alarming high and these deep blue lakes are appearing in increasing numbers, higher and higher up on the ice cap. These pictures, by photographer Timo Lieber, document the phenomenon. "I've always had a p...

2017-01-21 15:29:00
`
95 

The House Made of Newspapers  

If you go to Rockport someday, in Massachusetts, the United States, take some time to drive down Pigeon Hill Street and look out for a sign that says "Paper House". Park your car near the sidewalk and go visit this unique, one story red house that looks like an ordinary log cabin, but is actually made of paper. The paper house began in 1922 when Elis Stenman, a mechanical engineer, began building a small summer home. It started out like any other home, with a timber frame, shingle roof and f...

2017-01-20 15:49:00
`
65 

Ecce Homo: The Botched Painting That Saved a Town  

Eighty-three year old amateur artist Cecilia Gimenez had nothing but good intentions when she turned her attention towards a deteriorating fresco of Jesus Christ painted on the walls of the Sanctuary of Mercy church, in the small Spanish town of Borja. The fresco titled Ecce Homo (meaning "Behold the Man") was made by the Spanish artist Elías García Martínez in 1930, and although the work was of "little artistic importance", according to the general opinion amongst the press, because...

2017-01-19 15:54:00
`
69 

A Hanging Tree, Graves And Hemingway: The Colorful History of Captain Tony's Saloon  

There appears to be nothing remarkable about Captain Tony's Saloon housed in a yellow, two-storied building at 428 Greene Street in Key West, Florida. But the inside is steeped in history. Said to be the oldest bar in Key West, what is now Captain Tony's Saloon was the original Sloppy Joe's Bar, where legendary writer Ernest Hemingway spent most of his evenings. It was at Captain Tony's Saloon where well known folk country singer Jimmy Buffett got his start, playing for tips and

2017-01-18 11:08:00
`
85 

Kitsault: The Ghost Town Where Lights Are Still On But No One's Home  

Think ghost town and you'll probably imagine ruins —roofless houses, dirty broken windows, rotting floors, but at Kitsault, on the North Coast of British Columbia, Canada, you'll find rows upon rows of immaculately kept houses, shopping centers, restaurants, banks, pubs and theaters, all abandoned and sitting empty but untouched and spotless. The town's lights are always on, the streets are lined with neatly trimmed trees and there are freshly mowed lawns, yet no one has called Kitsault ...

2017-01-16 23:08:00
`
99 

The Infamous Mauthausen Stairs of Death  

The Mauthausen concentration camp, situated about 20 kilometers east of the city of Linz in Upper Austria, was the hub of one of the largest labor camp complexes in the German-controlled part of Europe, with a central camp near the village of Mauthausen, and nearly one hundred other subcamps located throughout Austria and southern Germany. Among these Mauthausen had the most brutal detention conditions. It was classified "Grade III", where the most "incorrigible political enemies of the Re...

2017-01-16 15:49:00
`
148 

La Pascualita, The Corpse Bride  

Peering out from behind the glass window of a small bridal shop in Chihuahua, Mexico, stands a tall, slender figure dressed in bridal costume. For close to ninety years, this unnervingly lifelike mannequin at La Popular —the bridal store— has been beguiling visitors from across America and Europe. The mannequin's pallid skin, her veined hands, the wrinkles on her palms, and her worn out fingernails have people more than convinced that La Pascualita, as she is popularly known, is not a dumm...

2017-01-12 21:14:00
`
101 

The Second Life of Wind Turbine Blades  

As the world pushes towards renewable energy, the wind energy industry comes to the forefront as a clean and a genuinely green energy. And like any other industry, the wind industry too is technologically evolving producing bigger and better upgrades, which means that old wind farms are being regularly decommissioned and refitted with upgraded equipment. Herein, comes the question of recycling, and the wind industry has a reputation to hold. Unfortunately, one of the largest component of a wind

2017-01-11 22:47:00
`
141 

The Frankincense Trees of Wadi Dawkah  

For more than 5,000 years, the Arabs have traded two highly prized fragrances —frankincense and myrrh— obtained from trees that grow exclusively in the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula. The dried, aromatic sap was transported by caravan across the Sinai desert to Egypt, via the so called "incense route", from where they were loaded onto ships and sailed to far away destinations across the Mediterranean Sea. Frankincense and myrrh were in high demand from Europe to Asia. The Greeks,...

2017-01-11 12:08:00
`
130 

Semaphore: The World's First Telegraph  

Smoke signals and beacons have been used to relay messages over short distances since ancient times, but the only reliable way to send messages over long distances was to dispatch a horse-riding messenger or a homing pigeon —until the arrival of the electrical telegraph. But fifty years before dots and dashes killed the messenger, for a brief period, there was another kind of telegraph in Europe —the optical variety, based on the same principle of flag waving that the Navy still use today. I...

2017-01-10 11:00:00
`
180 

Rosalia Lombardo: The Mummy That Blinks  

Rosalia Lombardo was only two years old when she died from pneumonia in 1920. Her premature death left her father so heartbroken that he approached the noted embalmer, Alfredo Salafia, and asked him to preserve Rosalia's body. Alfredo Salafia, a skillful embalmer and taxidermist, performed such an excellent operation on Rosalia that nearly a hundred years after her death, the little girl appears to be merely dozing beneath the glass case in the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Italy, where she r...

2017-01-07 15:19:00
`
176 

The Museum of Bad Art  

On rare occasions, a thrift store or a pawnshop can yield items of extreme value, but these are hardly the places you can expect to bump into the museum director of the Louvre or the Metropolitan. But Michael Frank is the head of a museum of a different breed, and a thrift store or a flea market is exactly the sort of place he would visit whenever he wants to enrich the museum's collection. Frank works for the Museum of Bad Art, the only museum in the world "dedicated to bringing the worst...

2017-01-06 15:36:00
`
152 

London Necropolis Railway: The Train For The Dead  

It was a difficult time to be alive in 1848 London, and worse still to be dead. A cholera epidemic had just swept through the city killing nearly 15,000 of its inhabitants, and bodies were literally pilling up besides churches waiting to be buried. But there was one problem: there was no space to bury. The population of London was soaring. In 1801, the city had less than a million people living. In 1851, that figure had more than doubled to almost two and a half million. But the 300 acres allott

2017-01-05 15:30:00
`
153 

Oasis Bordello Museum: A 1988 Cat House Frozen in Time  

In the heart of the Silver Valley mining district in the US state of Idaho, is an old dusty town called Wallace with a population of about eight hundred. But when the mines were booming in the early to the mid 20th century, there were four times as many residents. At that time men outnumbered women 200 to 1, so brothels were another thriving business. Wallace had several active whorehouses servicing the men at night after a laborious day of work at the mines. When prostitution was outlawed in 1

2017-01-04 15:05:00
`
15 

The Anti-Communist Dwarves of Wroclaw  

Scattered throughout the city of Wroclaw, Poland, are hundreds of small bronze statues of dwarves. They began appearing in the streets in 2005, but their roots go back to the 1980s, to an anti-communist underground movement called the Orange Alternative. In the 1980s when Poland was still under the communist rule, the Orange Alternative Movement started in Wroclaw as a way to peacefully protest against the authoritarian regime. The group found creative ways to stage protest, often bordering on s

2017-01-03 23:35:00
`
548 

Casey: The Small Town of Big Things  

At just over two square miles and with less than 3,000 inhabitants, the town of Casey in Illinois might be among the smaller towns of the United States, but it's home to some of the biggest things in the world. These include a wind chime, a rocking chair, knitting needles and a crochet hook, a mailbox, a pitchfork, a golf tee, a pair of wooden shoes, a coin, a birdcage, a yardstick, a pencil, a ear of corn, saguaro cactus and many more. Eight of these have found place in the Guinness Book of

2017-01-03 15:38:00
`
159 

The World's Smallest Monuments  

The Russian city of Tomsk is home to the smallest public monument in the world —a tiny bronze frog, sitting on top of a smooth rock. The sculpture is just 44 millimeters tall. The curious attraction, titled "the monument to the frog-traveler", was installed in 2013 near the front entrance of a hotel. It's creator, Oleg Kislitsky, wanted to create a monument dedicated to travelers and decided that the frog-traveler would be a fitting representation to his idea. The story of the frog trave...

2017-01-02 17:14:00
`
201 

Venice Minus Water  

For the second year in a row, low tides in Venice have sunk to such record levels that it has left the city almost entirely without water. Visitors who came to the city expecting to ride gondolas through the city's famous blue-green canals have found their plans foiled, as without water many of the city's primary transport have been left grounded on the canals' muddy beds. The exceptionally low water levels have been caused by abnormal tides this year, combined with drastically reduced ra...

2017-01-02 15:19:00
`
195 

The Swing of Casa Del Arbol, Ecuador  

For the past few years, Carlos Sanchez, a volunteer with the Military Geographical Institute, has been assisting a group of a volcanologists by observing and recording the activities of the Tungurahua volcano from a lonely tree house he had built on a green mountaintop near Baños, Ecuador, less than a mile away from the volcano's crater. From this vantage point, Sanchez watches for potential pyroclastic flows that can rapidly move downslope towards the city of Baños, located at the foot of...

2016-12-31 12:37:00
`
176 

A Blast From The Past: Episode 31  

This will be the last post for 2016. Happy New Year to everyone. See you next year. From the archives of Amusing Planet. Kiribati, The True Land of The Rising Sun When the sun sets on the evening of December 31 this year, and the world awaits the arrival of the new year, a tiny island country on the extreme east will already have begun celebrations. Located just to the west of the International Date Line, the Republic of Kiribati is one of the first places on earth to see the first rays of the r

2016-12-30 23:17:00
`
461 

Jet d'Eau: The Lake Geneva Fountain  

Since 1891, a gigantic jet of water has been Geneva's most important landmark. This narrow column of water shooting straight up to a staggering height of 140 meters is one of the most recognizable part of Geneva's skyline. It has some pretty impressive stats: every second, five hundred liters of water exit the 4-inch diameter nozzle at speeds of 200 km per hour. At any given moment, there are about 7,000 liters of water are in the air. Called Jet d'Eau, which means 'Water-Jet' in Fr...

2016-12-30 15:30:00
`
186 

The Island in a Lake on an Island in a Lake on an Island  

Lake Taal on the island of Luzon, in the northern end of the Philippines archipelago, holds a special distinction. It's one of only two lakes in the world, as of now, to have a third order island within it —the lake itself being part of the order. In other words, Lake Taal, which is located within the island of Luzon, has an island (Volcano Island) that has a lake (Crater Lake) that contains its own small island called Vulcan Point. Volcano Island is the location of Taal Volcano's histor...

2016-12-29 23:11:00
`
15 

The Electronic Ears That Listen to Secret Nuclear Tests  

Twenty years ago, the world's first Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) of 1996, that prohibits nations from conducting any kind of nuclear tests, either for civilian or for military purposes, was approved by the United Nations. At that time, more than two-thirds of the General Assembly's members supported it. That number has now grown to 183. Although the support was strong, some doubted whether the treaty could actually be enforced. After all, what prevents a nation from signi

2016-12-28 19:09:00
`
25 

The Giant Concrete Arrows Across The US  

In the early 1900s, the fastest way to deliver mail was by rail, but there was a machine that could travel faster than trains, and that was, of course, the airplane. So in the 1920s, the US Post Office began experimenting with this new flying machine that was recently used with great success in the First World War. There was, however, one major problem: unlike trains that could run all night and on all weather, airplanes could only fly during the day and only when the weather permits. Flying wa

2016-12-28 11:13:00
`
128 

Witley Park's Underwater Ballroom  

Between Godalming and Haslemere, in Surrey, near the English village of Witley, once stood one of the most lavish private residences in the world —the Witley Park. Originally called Lea Park, it belonged to a man named Whitaker Wright who made his fortune by defrauding shareholders of hundreds of million pounds —not once, but twice in two different continents. At the peak of his financial crimes, Wright bought the vast 1,400-acre Victorian estate from the 15th Earl of Derby and built an extr...

2016-12-23 20:49:00
`
188 

Operation Christmas Drop  

For the last sixty four years the US army has been playing Santa Claus to some 20,000 people inhabiting dozens of tiny Micronesian islands spread across a vast area in the western Pacific Ocean. Each year in December, these islanders receive all sorts of gifts and useful supplies packed in approximately a hundred crates and dropped gently to earth on green military parachutes. Known as Operation Christmas Drop, this effort on the part of the United States Air Force has been called the "longest...

2016-12-23 15:58:00
`
173 

Gävle Goat: The Christmas Goat That Vandals Can't Keep Their Hands Off  

Every year for Advent, about a month before Christmas, the town of Gavle, in Sweden, builds a giant Christmas goat out of straw. And every year, arsonists do their best to bring it down. The goat is a giant version of the Yule Goat, which has been a Christmas tradition in Sweden and other Scandinavian countries for many centuries, although its origin has been lost to history. The Gävle goat, on the other hand, began in 1966 as a way to attract customers to the businesses and restaurants in the ...

2016-12-22 21:56:00
`
159 

Saddam Hussein's Unfinished Mosques  

In the late 1990s, amidst rising poverty and with four million residents on the verge of famine, the former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein decided to spend hundreds of million dollars on three grandiose projects in a bid to bolster his Islamic credentials and preserve his tyrannical legacy. Only one was completed. The Umm al-Ma'arik mosque —Umm al-Ma'arik meaning "Mother of All Battles"— was designed to commemorate the First Gulf War of 1991-92, and at the same time, serve as ...

2016-12-22 15:27:00
`
190 

The Pout Of A Red-Lipped Batfish  

Named after Charles Darwin, Ogcocephalus darwini, or the red-lipped batfish, is an unusual looking fish. It is a type of anglerfish, the same kind Marlin and Dory had a narrow escape from while searching for Nemo in Finding Nemo, but instead of a fearful thorny mouth, it hangs a pair of bright, red lips, probably in a bid to disguise its predatory behavior. If not for its permanent natural pout, it might have been called cute even. But the red-lipped batfish is anything but. The fish is found in

2016-12-21 16:21:00
`
159 

Gilmerton Cove of Edinburg  

Just a few meters beneath the streets of Gilmerton, an ex-mining village on the southern edge of the city of Edinburgh, in Scotland, lies a series of underground passageways and chambers hand-carved from sandstone. The Gilmerton Cove, as it is called, has been known for centuries, but its age and purpose has been baffling people for generations. The traditional theory is that the Cove was the work of George Paterson, a local blacksmith who is said to have completed this underground dwelling hous

2016-12-21 16:16:00
`
151 

Citadelle Laferrière of Haiti  

The Citadelle Laferrière, located on top of a mountain in northern Haiti, is one of the largest fortresses in the Americas. The Citadel was built by Henri Christophe, who played a key role in the Haitian Revolution that eventually led to the country gaining independence from France in 1804. The fortress was built immediately after the revolution, between 1805 and 1820, and was part of a system of fortification designed to resist any attempt by the French to recapture the newly independent natio...

2016-12-20 20:24:00
`
132 

Towers of Silence  

The Zoroastrians have an unusual way of disposing off their dead. They neither bury them nor cremate them. Instead, corpses are left atop high towers known as dakhma, or Towers of Silence, where they are exposed to the elements and consumed by scavenger birds such as vultures, kites and crows. This macabre funeral practice arises from the belief that the dead are impure, not just physically because of decomposition, but because they are contaminated by the 'corpse demon' and evil spirits who...

2016-12-20 15:49:00
`
146 

Belchite: The Ruins of The Spanish Civil War  

Forty kilometer southeast of the city of Zaragoza, in north-eastern Spain, lies the ghost town of Belchite, that was destroyed in 1937 during the Spanish Civil War fought between the Republicans, who were loyal to the democratic, left-leaning Second Spanish Republic, and the Nationalists, a fascist group led by General Francisco Franco. A small town, lacking any military interest, Belchite suddenly found itself thrust towards the frontlines when the Republican launched an offensive against the N

2016-12-17 20:16:00
`
191 

11 Foot 8 Inches: The Infamous 'Can Opener' Bridge  

At 11 foot 8 inches, the Norfolk Southern-Gregson Street Overpass, located in Durham, North Carolina, United States, is a bit too short. The federal government recommends that bridges on public roads should have a clearance of at least 14 feet. But when this railroad trestle was built in the 1940s, there were no standards for minimum clearance. As a result, trucks would frequently hit the bridge and get its roof scrapped off. Durhan resident Jürgen Henn has been witnessing these crashes for ...

2016-12-16 20:01:00
`
162 

Nagoro: The Japanese Village of Dolls  

The village of Nagoro on the south-western island of Shikoku, in Japan, was once home to hundreds of residents. But over the years, Nagoro's population had fallen dramatically as the village's young inhabitants left to find work and better lives in cities, leaving the very old —the pensioners— as Nagoro's only residents today. In the early 2000s, when Ayano Tsukimi returned to her home in Nagoro after decades living in the sprawling metropolis of Osaka, she was saddened to find her v...

2016-12-16 12:05:00
`
170 

Lycurgus Cup: A Piece of Ancient Roman Nanotechnology  

In the 1950s, the British Museum came into possession an ancient glass chalice called the Lycurgus Cup, so named for its depiction of Dionysus's triumph over King Lycurgus of Thrace, who is shown entangled in grape vines, on the cup's outer surface. The craftsmanship is excellent — the inside is smooth while the outside has been painstakingly cut and etched to create a decorative cage-like structure around the inner cup. This class of Roman vessels are known as cage cups, and they were mos...

2016-12-14 21:12:00
`
166 

The Golden Fire Hydrant of San Francisco  

After a massive earthquake rocked the city of San Francisco on April 18, 1906, fires erupted all around the city from ruptured gas lines, overturned stoves and electric wires. This fire would rage for three days causing as much as 90% of the damage brought in by the earthquake. As the conflagration moved from block to block and district to district, every available fire-fighter and fire engine was pushed into service. Unfortunately, along with gas lines water mains were broken too and many of th

2016-12-14 15:25:00
`
221 

The Island Where Donkeys Wear Pyjamas  

The Island of Rhea, or Île-de-Re in French, off the west coast of France near La Rochelle, is a popular summer destination known for its gently sloping, sandy beaches, cool waters and constant light breeze, which are a real treat for families and tourists. The island's other famous attraction are its donkeys. The donkeys of Ile de Re are no ordinary breed —they are Poitou donkeys, or Baudet du Poitou in French. Originating from the Poitou region of France, they are one of the largest donk...

2016-12-13 21:24:00
`
198 

The Sewer Gas Destructor Lamps of England  

In Victorian England, gas build-up in underground sewers was often a problem for the city dwellers. Old sewers were not always laid on sufficient grade or on true line resulting in the accumulation of dangerous and highly inflammable methane gas that increased the chances of explosion. To prevent the build-up of stagnant gases, holes were poked into the sewer and free-standing vent pipes were installed to allow the foul gases to escape over the heads of pedestrians and the levels of adjacent hom

2016-12-13 21:23:00
`
239 

The 'Whiskey War' of Hans Island  

In the remote north of the Atlantic Ocean, right on the edge of the freezing waters of the Arctic Ocean, lies a tiny speck of an island. Named after a 19th century Greenlandic Arctic traveller, the half-square-mile Hans Island is as barren as any uninhabited island could ever be —a flat, exposed rocky knoll with no vegetation and no apparent natural resources. Yet, this nondescript piece of rock has been at the center of a territorial dispute between Canada and Denmark that has been raging for...

2016-12-12 21:34:00
`
173 




Top Activity Today

register to participate
xpfree
linkreferral.com
scommetix
tiny.cc/as8m2w
entrance
Blu
raymond@leboneconsulting.com
realitybites
ok-amjad.webs.com
EMR_Records
1bestofone.blogspot.com/2013/0...
Veronica
emmaaman
toneexcel.biz/?id=1304973
Contestwingo
contestwingo.com
merujhaspell
merujhaspell.webs.com


Activity Feed











anonymous  liked the article 'Jeremiah 5:30-31' in religion

anonymous  liked the article 'What happens when 3 voice-activated Yoda dolls meet each oth...' in vids

anonymous  liked the article 'White House Lawn Closed for Suspicious Package (PHOTO) (UPDA...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'Katherine Jackson Won't Appear Against Nephew in Court' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article '16 spectacular facts about giant sequoias ' in green

anonymous  liked the article 'Ricky Gervais’ ‘The Office’ Spinoff Film...' in vids

anonymous  liked the article 'King And Queen by weknow' in web development

anonymous  liked the article 'Man Cleared After Admitting He Put Bodily Fluid In Woman's C...' in politics


anonymous  liked the article 'March 22—Need to Know' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'Geek and Sexy - Jinx Boudoir' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Snapshot: Zayn Malik by Mariano Vivanco for Sunday Times Mar...' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'ExxonMobil app offers Samsung Pay' in business

anonymous  liked the article ' Management Secrets of the Red Army Hockey Team ...' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Mobility Ventures MV-1 – First Drive Review' in vehicles

anonymous  liked the article '5yo AQHA - Honey -Cowboy Mounted Shooting, Barrels, Extreme ...' in animals

anonymous  liked the article 'Wizards' Beal to miss Friday's game; Wall to rest Saturday' in basketball

anonymous  liked the article 'Top IFTTT recipes that improve your Android device' in web development

anonymous  liked the article 'New Music: Ambré Perkins feat. Kehlani – ‘No ...' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Business News' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Faraday Future FF 91, Lucid Air First Rides' in vehicles

anonymous  liked the article 'Google Rolls Out Ads to Google Home, Then Promptly Removes T...' in web marketing

anonymous  liked the article 'Make your new iPhone or iPad work harder with five of the be...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'Citrus Springs Vacant Lot For Sale in Citrus County, Florida' in real estate

anonymous  liked the article 'The Guardians in Louisiana - Rescuing a Cat and Her Kittens' in animals

anonymous  liked the article 'Cloud 9 Miracle Steal Keeps Them Undefeated' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'Blac Chyna Reveals She Had to ''Hide'' Her F...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'Hebrews 3:6' in religion

anonymous  liked the article 'WATCH: Zach LaVine throws down the dunk of the season over A...' in golf

anonymous  liked the article 'Scientists Build a Menstrual Biochip That Does Everything Bu...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'GameStop - Nintendo Switch with Gray Joy-Con Console Starter...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Call the Rest of the Cast: Kiernan Shipka Is Down for a 'Mad...' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'Is this guy flirting or being friendly?' in family

anonymous  liked the article '9dpo starting my testing thread' in family

anonymous  liked the article 'How 'Game of Thrones' Got Its Groove Back' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Tornado watch in effect until early Sunday as severe thunder...' in weather

anonymous  liked the article 'Free First Time Home Buyer Class - January 17th' in real estate

anonymous  liked the article 'Macy's 8-Piece Spa Gift Set for $13 + free shipping' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Asthma Much More Lethal for Black Children ' in health

anonymous  liked the article 'The Modern Way to Wear Your Favorite Shoe Style' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article ' Which Generation Has Better Work Ethic? ' in health

anonymous  liked the article 'Must-Have Qualities for Building Trust With Your Kids' in religion

anonymous  liked the article 'Odell Beckham Jr. Does LeBron Chalk Toss After Punt Return T...' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'Crocs | Men' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Undertale | W.D Gaster | Polymer clay | Speed Buil' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'ANT-MAN Star Evangeline Lilly Offers Her Thoughts On Why DC ...' in comics

anonymous  liked the article 'Teen Faces Charges After Being Accused of Stealing 65-Cent M...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'The Week in History: December 9-15' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Pink Convict Cichlid, Zebra Cichlid, White Convict Cichlid' in animals

anonymous  liked the article 'Anthony Anderson talks about his health and his part on blac...' in health

anonymous  liked the article 'Twins' Dozier joins list of 2B legends with 40th HR' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'how to make school attendance system ??' in web development

anonymous  liked the article 'National Lampoon's Vacation Boxset on Blu-ray for $13 + $3 s...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Tom Taylor Talks Injustice 2 Comic & Explores Events In ...' in comics

anonymous  liked the article 'The U.S. Should Take A Few Cues From Norway, Just Voted Happ...' in health

anonymous  liked the article 'Agua de Jamaica by Cat Butcher' in web development

anonymous  liked the article 'Timeline Photos' in home

anonymous  liked the article 'Timeline Photos' in home

anonymous  liked the article 'clearblue digital ovulation tests' in family

anonymous  liked the article 'AndreaMosaic: mosaic creation software' in web development

anonymous  liked the article 'A Guy's 100% Unfiltered Perspective On What Makes Sex I...' in family

anonymous  liked the article 'BMW Sticking with Diesels in the United States' in vehicles

anonymous  liked the article 'clearblue digital ovulation tests' in family

anonymous  liked the article 'Wells Fargo & Co: The Pain Is Just Beginning for WFC' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Yahoo’s Racial Typo Births Hilarious Twitter Hashtag T...' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Jalopnik This Is Why Your Car Makes That Weird Whining Soun...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'Eighty BlazerDancers Return to Rip City for Reunion Performa...' in basketball

anonymous  liked the article 'Jordan Howard injured; Bears still determining nature and ex...' in football

anonymous  liked the article 'Apple Inc. (AAPL) Stock Can’t Please Everybody' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'MtG: Avacyn The Purifier' in art

anonymous  liked the article '5 iconic magic tricks revealed' in vids

anonymous  liked the article 'See Who's Using Your Wi-Fi & Boot Them Off with Your And...' in how-to

anonymous  liked the article '13 Allergy-Friendly Treats for Kids Birthday Parties' in family

anonymous  liked the article 'Real Madrid vs. Real Soceidad live stream info, TV channel, ...' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'Blue Jackets earned cred with streak' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'Why PETA Is A Giant Nest Of Lies' in humor

anonymous  liked the article 'Gal Gadot Prepares For War As WONDER WOMAN In A New Still; P...' in comics

anonymous  liked the article 'Paul Westerberg unveils The I Don't Cares' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'After Her Death, Lori Ruff's Family Discovered She Was a Com...' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'The 6 Stages Of Sharing A Bed With Your Significant Other' in family

anonymous  liked the article 'Muhammad Ali -- 'The Greatest' Dead at 74 (VIDEOS + PHOTOS)' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'More Fresh Beef Is Coming to McDonald’s' in food

anonymous  liked the article 'Keon Broxton Suffers Fractured Wrist' in baseball

anonymous  liked the article 'John Barrowman goes au naturel in preparation for his 50th b...' in lgbt

anonymous  liked the article 'Watch Big Sean Party With Elderly Performing 'Moves&apo...' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Google testing new look for local inventory ads in place of...' in web marketing

anonymous  liked the article 'Amazon - $20 Off Kindle E-Readers ' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Fitbit, Macy’s Slip into Monday’s 52-Week Low Cl...' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Uma Thurman -- Auction Winner Ate Her Face ... and It Was 'N...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'Warriors' Draymond Green opens up about his heated discussio...' in golf
All Rights Reserved.   Terms Of Use   Contact Us