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Science Daily: News Articles in Science, Health, Environment Technology

Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate environment, computers, engineering, health medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations. id=metasummary ScienceDaily -- the Internet's premier science news web site -- brings you the latest discoveries in science, health & medicine, the environment, space, technology, and computers, from the world's leading universities and research institutions. Updated several times a day, Science Daily also offers free search of its archive of more than 80,000 stories, as well as related articles, images, videos, books, and journal references in hundreds of different topics, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, and more.



New efficient, low-temperature catalyst for hydrogen production  

Scientists have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). The discovery could improve the performance of fuel cells that run on hydrogen fuel but can be poisoned by CO.

2017-06-23 04:23:45
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Biologist develops new method to calculate populations of elusive species  

An innovative new method of estimating the density of snake populations without employing the capture-mark-recapture technique has been created by a biologist.

2017-06-23 02:36:02
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System detects, translates sarcasm on social media  

Researchers have developed a machine translation system for interpreting sarcastic statements in social media. It could one day help people on the autism spectrum, who often have difficulty interpreting sarcasm, irony and humor.

2017-06-23 02:34:01
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An enzyme to synthetize carbohydrates designed  

Sugar or carbohydrate synthesis is important for the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines and new drugs. In a study, researchers have synthesized carbohydrates with enzymes through a reaction that was not much studied so far on these biomolecules and which creates few by-products.

2017-06-23 01:40:14
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Switchable DNA mini-machines store information  

Biomedical engineers have built simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two different shapes. The arrays' inventors say they could be harnessed to make nanotech sensors or amplifiers. Potentially, they could be combined to form logic gates, the parts of a molecular computer.

2017-06-22 21:26:14
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Catalyst mimics the z-scheme of photosynthesis  

A new study demonstrates a process with great potential for developing technologies for reducing CO2 levels.

2017-06-22 20:58:08
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Elevated rate of autism symptoms found in children with Tourette syndrome  

Around one in five children with Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements and vocalizations, met criteria for autism, a study shows. But this prevalence may be more a reflection of similarity in symptoms than actual autism, according to the study's researchers.

2017-06-22 20:22:05
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The curious case of the warped Kuiper Belt  

The plane of the solar system is warped in the belt's outer reaches, signaling the presence of an unknown Mars-to-Earth-mass planetary object far beyond Pluto, according to new research. 

2017-06-22 19:47:15
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Eating your feelings? The link between job stress, junk food and sleep  

Stress during the workday can lead to overeating and unhealthy food choices at dinnertime, but there could be a buffer to this harmful pattern.

2017-06-22 19:45:07
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Human genes for coronary artery disease make them more prolific parents  

Coronary artery disease may have persisted in human populations because the genes that cause this late-striking disease also contribute to having a greater numbers of children.

2017-06-22 19:09:07
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High fat diet reduces gut bacteria, Crohn's disease symptoms  

A high fat diet may lead to specific changes in gut bacteria that could fight harmful inflammation -- a major discovery for patients suffering from Crohn's disease, research indicates. Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel syndrome, causes debilitating intestinal swelling, cramping, and diarrhea. The disease affects half a million people in the United States, but its cause is yet unclear.

2017-06-22 18:31:07
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Ultra-thin camera creates images without lenses  

Engineers have built a camera that does not need lenses to focus light. It can switch from a fish-eye to a telephoto lens instantaneously.

2017-06-22 18:28:47
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Previously unknown pine marten diversity discovered  

The elusive American pine marten, a little-studied member of the weasel family, might be more diverse than originally thought, according to new research.

2017-06-22 15:02:08
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Alzheimer's disease study links brain health, physical activity  

People at risk for Alzheimer's disease who do more moderate-intensity physical activity, but not light-intensity physical activity, are more likely to have healthy patterns of glucose metabolism in their brain, according to a new study.

2017-06-22 13:44:50
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Negative tweets can trash TV programs for other viewers  

Negative social media comments about a television show tend to lower enjoyment for other viewers, while positive comments may not significantly boost their enjoyment, according to researchers.

2017-06-22 13:23:57
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How serious is binge drinking among college students with disabilities?  

College students with disabilities binge drink more often than their non-disabled student peers, research concludes. The study provides the first picture of alcohol use and binge drinking by US college students with disabilities.

2017-06-22 13:05:23
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Flipping the switch to stop tumor development  

Researchers show how a protein prevents the uncontrolled expansion of immune cells, and have outlined their findings in a new report.

2017-06-22 12:48:27
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Better use of current drugs to target cancer  

Researchers worked backwards, employing a series of drugs used in the clinic to understand a new way that cancer stem cells can be killed.

2017-06-22 12:38:33
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Frequent sexual activity can boost brain power in older adults  

More frequent sexual activity has been linked to improved brain function in older adults, according to a new study.

2017-06-22 12:33:59
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Acetaminophen during pregnancy can inhibit masculinity  

Paracetamol during pregnancy can inhibit the development of 'male behavior' in mice. New research shows that it can reduce sex drive and aggressive behavior.

2017-06-22 12:04:38
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Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adult cancer survivors has declined  

From 1999/2000 to 2011/2012, exposure to secondhand smoke among nonsmoking adult cancer survivors declined from 39.6 percent to 15.7 percent, but rates of exposure were higher among those with a history of a smoking-related cancer and those living below the federal poverty level compared with those with other types of cancer and those with the highest incomes, respectively.

2017-06-22 11:57:25
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Text messaging effective support in treatment of HIV and tuberculosis  

Mobile phone text messaging is a powerful tool for improving quality of care, researchers show. A new study has developed and tested a method in Mozambique, helping patients with severe diseases to follow through with their treatments.

2017-06-22 11:51:46
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Simulated honeybees can use simple brain circuits for complex learning  

Honeybees may not need key brain structures known as mushroom bodies in order to learn complex associations between odors and rewards, according to new research.

2017-06-22 11:22:24
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Battling infectious diseases with 3-D protein structures  

The 3-D atomic structures of more than 1,000 proteins are potential targets for drugs and vaccines to combat some of the world's most dangerous emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, an international team of scientists has determined.

2017-06-22 11:13:36
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How do genes get new jobs? Wasp venom offers new insights  

A new study describes how four closely related species of parasitic wasps change their venoms rapidly in order to adapt to new hosts, and proposes that co-option of single copy genes may be a common but relatively understudied mechanism of evolution for new gene functions, particularly under conditions of rapid evolutionary change.

2017-06-22 11:11:20
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Similarities between next-generation prostate cancer drugs discovered  

For the first time, researchers have shown how a class of advanced prostate cancer drugs are processed in the body and how their anti-tumor activity might change depending on how they are metabolized. Their pre-clinical findings may lay the foundation for improving therapies for treatment-resistant, aggressive prostate cancer.

2017-06-22 10:52:12
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What percentage of ALS is genetic?  

Up to 90 percent of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) report that they have no family history of the disease. Now, new research has found approximately 17 percent of such ALS cases may be caused by a gene mutation, according to a study.

2017-06-22 10:48:43
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Biofilms: The eradication has begun  

Biofilms are slimy, glue-like membranes that are produced by microbes in order to colonize surfaces. They protect microbes from the body's immune system and increase their resistance to antibiotics. Biofilms represent one of the biggest threats to patients in hospital settings. But there is good news: scientists have developed a novel enzyme technology that prevents the formation of biofilms and can also break them down.

2017-06-22 10:25:54
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New spectral eye video database SPEED revolutionizes eye-tracking  

Techniques to acquire spectral data have been static for a long time - until now. Exciting and novel spectral video technologies are emerging, allowing us to extract increasingly dynamic knowledge from light. Using a spectral video device in eye-tracking, computational spectral imaging and eye-tracking researchers have created a novel - first of its kind - combined spectral video/spectral image database: the SPectral Eye vidEo Database, SPEED.

2017-06-22 09:45:49
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Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on Earth  

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, a research team can map multiple indicators of monkey distribution, including human activity zones as inferred from roads and settlements, direct detections from mosquito-derived iDNA, animal sound recordings, plus detections of other species that are usually found when monkeys are present, such as other large vertebrates.

2017-06-22 09:40:19
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Holey pattern boosts coherence of nanomechanical membrane vibrations  

Researchers have introduced a new type of nanomechanical resonator, in which a pattern of holes localizes vibrations to a small region in a 30 nm thick membrane. The pattern dramatically suppresses coupling to random fluctuations in the environment, boosting the vibrations' coherence. The researchers' quantitative understanding and numerical models provide a versatile blueprint for ultracoherent nanomechanical devices. Among others, this enables a new generation of nanomechanical sensors to prob

2017-06-22 09:23:56
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Algae: The final frontier  

Algae dominate the oceans that cover nearly three-quarters of our planet, and produce half of the oxygen that we breathe. And yet fewer than 10 percent of the algae have been formally described in the scientific literature, as noted in a new review.

2017-06-22 09:15:13
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Uncomfortable summer heat makes people moody and unhelpful, new research finds  

When when it's uncomfortably hot, we're less likely to be helpful or 'prosocial,' research concludes.

2017-06-22 08:59:18
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How pythons regenerate their organs and other secrets of the snake genome  

Snakes exhibit incredible evolutionary adaptations, including the ability to rapidly regenerate their organs and produce venom. Scientists studied these adaptations using genetic sequencing and advanced computing. Supercomputers helped the team identify a number of genes associated with organ growth in Burmese pythons, study secondary contact in related rattlesnake species, and develop tools to recognize evolutionary changes caused by natural selection.

2017-06-22 08:48:21
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The biology of uterine fluid: How it informs the fetus of mom's world  

A developing fetus bathes in a mixture of cellular secretions and proteins unique to its mother's uterus. Before fertilization, the pH of uterine fluid helps create a conducive environment for sperm migration, and afterward, its volume supports the embryo as it implants onto the wall of the uterus. Recent evidence suggests that uterine fluid may play another role in embryonic development: communicating the mother's outside conditions to the fetus,

2017-06-22 08:04:12
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Dogs to sniff out chemicals that identify human remains  

New research to help improve accuracy of criminal investigations involves a partnership between humans and their canine coworkers.

2017-06-22 07:51:50
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HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infant  

HIV-positive women with CMV in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV to their infants. The research also found that they are nearly 30 times likelier to transmit CMV to their infants.

2017-06-22 07:43:01
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Origins of Sun's swirling spicules discovered  

For the first time, a computer simulation -- so detailed it took a full year to run -- shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how spicules can break free of the sun's surface and surge upward so quickly.

2017-06-22 06:40:37
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Cells in fish's spinal discs repair themselves  

A unique repair mechanism has been discovered in the developing backbone of zebrafish that could give insight into why spinal discs of longer-lived organisms like humans degenerate with age. The repair mechanism protects fluid-filled cells of the notochord, the precursor of the spine, from mechanical stress. Notochord cells eventually form the gelatinous center of intervertebral discs, the structures that often degenerate with age to cause back and neck pain.

2017-06-22 06:27:05
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How eggs got their shapes  

The evolution of the amniotic egg -- complete with membrane and shell -- was key to vertebrates leaving the oceans and colonizing the land and air but how bird eggs evolved into so many different shapes and sizes has long been a mystery. Now, an international team of scientists took a quantitative approach to that question and found that adaptations for flight may have been critical drivers of egg-shape variation in birds.

2017-06-22 06:17:33
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Flexible wearable electronics use body heat for energy  

In a proof-of-concept study, engineers have designed a flexible thermoelectric energy harvester that has the potential to rival the effectiveness of existing power wearable electronic devices using body heat as the only source of energy.

2017-06-22 06:08:55
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Spinal cord injury: Using cortical targets to improve motor function  

New research provides the first evidence that cortical targets could represent a novel therapeutic site for improving motor function in humans paralyzed by spinal cord injury.

2017-06-22 06:08:53
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Sea sponges stay put with anchors that bend but don't break  

The anchors that hold Venus' flower basket sea sponges to the ocean floor have an internal architecture that increases their ability to bend, according to a new study. Understanding that natural architecture could inform future human-made materials.

2017-06-22 06:06:40
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Study answers why ketamine helps depression, offers target for safer therapy  

Scientists have identified a key protein that helps trigger ketamine's rapid antidepressant effects in the brain, a crucial step to developing alternative treatments to the controversial drug being dispensed in a growing number of clinics across the country.

2017-06-22 05:55:42
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Paradox of pills: Tablet 'overload' may be causing harm and putting lives at risk, warn researchers  

Around three million people take multiple medicines, but no reliable systems exist to help patients and carers manage their pills. When medication management goes wrong, particularly with older people, the effect can be dreadful for everyone involved. A novel study linking the experiences of patients, carers and practitioners with a review of the scientific evidence, aims to find ways to improve medication management and the quality of life of older people and their carers.

2017-06-22 05:52:22
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Rare cells are 'window into the gut' for the nervous system  

Specialized cells in the gut sense potentially noxious chemicals and trigger electrical impulses in nearby nerve fibers, according to a new study, report scientists.

2017-06-22 05:50:35
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Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk  

A study which investigated more than 2,000 children across 80 primary schools in Devon, has found that children who are younger than their peers when they start school are more likely to develop poorer mental health, as rated by parents and teachers.

2017-06-22 05:39:15
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Pathogen that causes sleeping sickness: Promising new target  

The life-threatening African trypanosomiasis, also called sleeping sickness, is caused by protozoa of the species Trypanosoma brucei. A team of researchers has studied the pathogens and reported exciting news: The trypanosomes have a so far unknown enzyme which does not exist in humans and other vertebrates. This makes it a promising target for therapy.

2017-06-22 05:13:09
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Select memories can be erased, leaving others intact  

Different types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study.

2017-06-22 04:58:55
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First Chikungunya-infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes found in Brazil  

While more than 13,000 cases of Chikungunya viral disease were reported in Brazil in 2015, scientists had never before detected the virus in a captured mosquito in this country. Now, researchers have identified a mosquito -- caught in the Brazilian city of Aracaju -- that's naturally infected with the East-Central-South-African (ECSA) genotype of Chikungunya.

2017-06-22 04:45:21
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Lessons from whale population collapse could help future species at risk  

There were warning signs that populations of commercially harvested whales were heading for global collapse up to 40 years before the event, a study of historic whaling records has revealed.

2017-06-22 04:29:41
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Adulthood wellbeing lower for single-parent kids  

People who grew up in single-parent families have lower levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction in adulthood, according to new research.

2017-06-22 04:28:29
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Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?  

In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes them.

2017-06-22 04:11:22
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Lab grown human colons change study of GI disease  

Scientists used human pluripotent stem cells to generate human embryonic colons in a laboratory that function much like natural human tissues when transplanted into mice, according to new research. The study is believed to be the first time human colon organoids have been successfully tissue engineered in this manner, according to researchers who led the project.

2017-06-22 03:52:04
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Studies of US Lassa fever patient offer clues about immune response, viral persistence  

Researchers were able to closely study a Lassa fever patient's immune response over time after he was evacuated to the US for treatment. An experimental drug, favipiravir, was used in treating the US patient and an additional patient infected with Lassa virus in Germany. The drug appeared to have few serious side effects, but its efficacy is unknown. Individual patient reports cannot be generalized to broader population, but findings suggest promising areas for future research.

2017-06-22 03:49:28
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New technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation  

Some basic processes underlying memory consolidation have been discovered by researchers. The work identifies some of the electrical events responsible for specific neuronal activity in the hippocampus: a region of the brain with fundamental roles in episodic memory.

2017-06-22 03:38:43
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A simple solution to protect critical infrastructure  

Experts have provided a solution for stopping flooding in subway tunnels in the form of a giant inflatable plug that will seal them off and stop water from flowing throughout the subway system into stations and other subway lines.

2017-06-22 03:08:14
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UV-sensing protein in brain of marine annelid zooplankton  

Larvae of a marine ragworm Platynereis dumerilii have been studied as a zooplankton model, and possess photoreceptor cells in the brain to regulate circadian swimming behavior. This study revealed that a photoreceptive protein in the brain photoreceptor cells is UV (ultra-violet) sensitive. Since avoidance of UV irradiation is a major cause of a large-scale daily movement of zooplankton, the UV sensor in the brain would be important for physiology and ecology of the zooplankton model.

2017-06-22 03:03:30
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Interventions to prevent cognitive decline, dementia  

Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report.

2017-06-22 02:38:03
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Identified brain circuitry bridges neural and behavioral roles in PTSD  

Specific cerebral circuitry bridges chemical changes deep in the brain and the more outward behavioral expressions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which could lead to more objective biomarkers for the disorder, according to a comprehensive review of rapidly changing data.

2017-06-22 02:36:24
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Peroxisomal biogenesis disorder: New link to sugar metabolism  

Peroxisomal biogenesis disorder, which has been linked only to lipid metabolism, is also associated with sugar metabolism.

2017-06-22 02:31:22
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How bacterial organelles assemble  

Scientists are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell. This work could benefit research in bioenergy and pathogenesis, and it could lead to new methods of bioengineering bacteria for beneficial purposes.

2017-06-22 02:10:29
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African leopards revealed: Study documents minute-to-minute behavior of elusive cats  

The elusive behavior of the African leopard has been revealed in great detail for the first time as part of a sophisticated study that links the majestic cat's caloric demands and its drive to kill.

2017-06-22 02:08:53
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Radioactive elements in Cassiopeia A suggest a neutrino-driven explosion  

Stars exploding as supernovae are the main sources of heavy chemical elements in the Universe. In particular, radioactive atomic nuclei are synthesized in the hot, innermost regions during the explosion and can thus serve as probes of the unobservable physical processes that initiate the blast. Using elaborate computer simulations, a team of researchers was able to explain the recently measured spatial distributions of radioactive titanium and nickel in Cassiopeia A, a roughly 340 year old gas r

2017-06-22 02:04:59
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For the first time in a patient, researchers use long-read genome sequencing  

Researchers have used a next-generation technology called long-read sequencing to diagnose a patient's rare genetic condition that current technology failed to diagnose.

2017-06-22 01:51:16
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Can animal diet mitigate greenhouse emissions?  

The inclusion of agroindustrial by-products in pig feed can reduce the nitrous oxide emissions (N2O) of the slurry used as manures up to 65%, suggests new research.

2017-06-22 01:34:50
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First-line immunotherapy treatment can improve survival for subset of lung cancer patients  

Findings from a phase III clinical trial for advanced lung cancer patients could help oncologists better predict which patients are likely to receive the most benefit from immunotherapy as a first-line treatment based on the unique molecular characteristics of their tumor, according to a new study.

2017-06-22 01:34:24
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Pollinator extinctions alter structure of ecological networks  

The absence of a single dominant bumblebee species from an ecosystem disrupts foraging patterns among a broad range of remaining pollinators in the system -- from other bees to butterflies, beetles and more, field experiments show.

2017-06-22 01:30:24
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Predicting cognitive deficits in people with Parkinson's disease  

Parkinson's disease is commonly thought of as a movement disorder, but after years of living with the disease, approximately 25 percent of patients also experience deficits in cognition that impair function. A newly developed research tool may help predict a patient's risk for developing dementia and could enable clinical trials aimed at finding treatments to prevent the cognitive effects of the disease.

2017-06-21 21:46:51
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New technique makes brain scans better  

To help scientists take advantage of huge numbers of low-quality patient brain scans, a team of researchers has devised a way to boost the quality of these MRI scans so that they can be used for large scale studies of how strokes affect different people.

2017-06-21 21:04:25
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Mystery of unexplained 'bright nights' solved  

Dating back to the first century, scientists, philosophers and reporters have noted the occasional occurrence of 'bright nights,' when an unexplained glow in the night sky lets observers see distant mountains, read a newspaper or check their watch. A new study accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, uses satellite data to present a possible explanation for these puzzling historical phenomena.

2017-06-21 20:48:11
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An end to population aging in China, Germany, USA  

New measures of aging, combined with UN population projections, show that population aging is likely to end before 2100 in China, Germany, and the USA.

2017-06-21 20:45:04
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'Little brain' plays a major role in schizophrenia  

The cerebellum is among the most affected brain regions in schizophrenia, new research has found. Compared to healthy individuals, cerebellar volume was smaller in patients with schizophrenia. The study is the largest brain imaging study to date on the cerebellum in schizophrenia, with important implications for our understanding of the disorder.

2017-06-21 19:52:42
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Parkinson's is partly an autoimmune disease, study finds  

Researchers have found the first direct evidence that autoimmunity plays a role in Parkinson's disease, suggesting that immunosuppressants might play a role in treatment.

2017-06-21 19:42:54
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Trash-picking seagulls excrete tons of nutrients  

At least 1.4 million seagulls feed at landfills in North America. Aside from the nuisance they pose, a study finds their nutrient-rich feces may threaten the health of nearby waters. The study estimates North American gulls deposit 240 tons of nitrogen and 39 tons of phosphorus into nearby lakes and reservoirs each year, fertilizing algae and weeds and costing local governments about $100 million in nutrient offset costs.

2017-06-21 19:40:44
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Understanding how pain is bugging you  

Gut bacteria play a key role in regulating abdominal pain and its associated changes in the brain and spinal cord, at least in mice, report scientists.

2017-06-21 19:25:21
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Piglets prefer new toys, behavior study shows  

We can't help but be tempted by new things. We see it in a child's eyes when she opens a new toy, and feel it every time a new version of the iPhone is released. It turns out our preference for shiny, new things is pretty universal throughout the animal kingdom. Yes, even piglets prefer new toys.

2017-06-21 19:10:10
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Could flu during pregnancy raise risk for autism?  

Researchers found no evidence that laboratory-diagnosis alone of maternal influenza during pregnancy is associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the offspring. They did, however, find a trend toward risk in mothers with a laboratory diagnosis of influenza and self-reported symptoms of severe illness. This trend did not achieve statistical significance.

2017-06-21 17:59:36
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Parents of newborn daughters take fewer risks study suggests  

A study has examined the effect of learning a child's gender on parents' attitudes towards risky behaviors. In this first of its kind study, the authors gathered prenatal and post-birth data from the pediatric wards of hospitals in both the United Kingdom and Ukraine, allowing for longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of those attitudes.

2017-06-21 16:05:06
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Neurons that regenerate, neurons that die  

Investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others.

2017-06-21 15:29:18
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New statistical method finds shared ancestral gene variants involved in autism's cause  

Researchers believe that theirs is the first rigorous statistical evidence that ancient variations in the human genome contribute to autism -- each, most likely, having a very small effect. The method investigatorss used in the new study was family-based and compared 'discordant sibilings,' one with and one without autism to a separate collection of affected individuals. The sample included over 16,000 people from nearly 4000 families.

2017-06-21 15:27:14
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Reconstruction of ancient chromosomes offers insight into mammalian evolution  

Researchers have gone back in time, at least virtually, computationally recreating the chromosomes of the first eutherian mammal, the long-extinct, shrewlike ancestor of all placental mammals.

2017-06-21 15:04:10
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Serotonin improves sociability in mouse model of autism  

Scientists have linked early serotonin deficiency to several symptoms that occur in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study examined serotonin levels, brain circuitry, and behavior in a mouse model of ASD. Experiments showed that increasing serotonergic activity in the brain during early development led to more balanced brain activity and improved the abnormal sociability of these mice.

2017-06-21 14:46:54
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New research leverages big data to predict severe weather  

Every year, severe weather endangers millions of people and causes billions of dollars in damage worldwide. But new research has found a way to better predict some of these threats by harnessing the power of big data.

2017-06-21 14:42:36
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Massive dead disk galaxy challenges theories of galaxy evolution  

By combining the power of a 'natural lens' in space with the capability of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers made a surprising discovery -- the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang.

2017-06-21 14:01:09
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Cow herd behavior is fodder for complex systems analysis  

With closer inspection, researchers have recognized that what appears to be a randomly dispersed herd peacefully eating grass is in fact a complex system of individuals in a group facing differing tensions. A team of mathematicians and a biologist has now built a mathematical model that incorporates a cost function to behavior in such a herd to understand the dynamics of such systems.

2017-06-21 13:58:54
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Clear view on stem cell development  

Today, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual. However, impairments like shadows or changes in the background complicate the interpretation of data. Now, researchers have developed a software that corrects images to make hitherto hidden development steps visible.

2017-06-21 13:38:22
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Selfies: We love how we look and we're here to show you  

Nearly 52 percent of all selfies fell into the appearance category: pictures of people showing off their make-up, clothes, lips, etc. Pics about looks were two times more popular than the other 14 categories combined, research found.

2017-06-21 13:32:54
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New catalyst paves way for carbon neutral fuel  

Scientists have paved the way for carbon neutral fuel with the development of a new efficient catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air into synthetic natural gas in a 'clean' process using solar energy.

2017-06-21 13:21:45
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Depressed patients more likely to be prescribed opioids  

Patients with low back pain who were depressed were more likely to be prescribed opioids and receive higher doses, research has found. Understanding these prescribing patterns sheds new light on the current opioid epidemic and may help determine whether efforts to control prescription opioid abuse are effective.

2017-06-21 13:12:14
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How did bird babysitting co-ops evolve?  

It's easy to make up a story to explain an evolved trait; proving that's what happened is much harder. Here scientists test ideas about cooperative breeding in birds and find a solution that resolves earlier disagreements.

2017-06-21 13:07:42
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1 

Wave beams mix and stir the ocean to create climate  

Waves deep within the ocean play an important role in establishing ocean circulation, arising when tidal currents oscillate over an uneven ocean bottom. The internal waves generated by this process stir and mix the ocean, bringing cold, deep water to the surface to be warmed by the sun. Investigators now explain how to tell which way internal waves will go. The proposed theory unifies several previously understood explanations of wave propagation.

2017-06-21 13:06:31
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2 

Biological fingerprint of tuberculosis meningitis discovered in children  

Children with tuberculosis meningitis have a biological fingerprint that can be used to assess the severity of the condition, help decide the best course of treatment, and provide clues for novel treatments, report researchers.

2017-06-21 13:02:18
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1 

When lovers touch, their breathing, heartbeat syncs, pain wanes, study shows  

When an empathetic partner holds a lover's hand, their heart rates and breathing rates sync and her pain subsides, new research shows. Authors say such 'interpersonal synchronization' could play a role in the analgesic impacts of touch.

2017-06-21 13:01:11
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1 

The world's largest canary  

Biologists have now proven that the endangered São Tome grosbeak is the world's largest canary -- 50 percent larger than the runner-up.

2017-06-21 12:46:14
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1 

New antibody uses 1-2 punch to potentially treat blood cancers  

Researchers have developed a two-pronged approach to blood cancer treatment: 1) attacking cancer cells directly and/or 2) driving them from the nurturing bone marrow environment into the peripheral blood streams, where they are more vulnerable (for example, to chemotherapy).

2017-06-21 12:41:53
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5 

To work or not to work: Moms' well being rests on what she wants  

The center of a mother's life tends to be her children and her family, but if mom is unhappy about staying home with the kids or about working outside the home then she (and anyone close to her) may suffer, according to new research. The research showed that the best adjusted mothers were the ones who pursued the lifestyle they wanted.

2017-06-21 12:35:21
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3 

Molecular test for common causes of vaginitis receives FDA approval  

A molecular diagnostic test accurately distinguishes among the three most common causes of vaginitis, an inflammation of vaginal tissue that researchers say accounts for millions of visits to medical clinics and offices in the US each year.

2017-06-21 12:21:07
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2 

Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics  

Versatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report that mimicking the structure of the 'powdery alligator-flag' plant has enabled them to make a graphene-based aerogel that meets these needs.

2017-06-21 11:50:50
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2 

The (extra) eyes have it: Researchers investigate the wisdom of crowds in the realm of visual searches  

Your doctor is an expert with many years of experience. So when s/he tells you, upon reviewing all the fancy tomographic imaging you had done, that the tenderness in your breast is just some minor irritation, you want to believe her/him and leave it at that.

2017-06-21 11:30:59
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2 




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