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Science Daily: News Articles in Science, Health, Environment Technology

Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate environment, computers, engineering, health medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations. id=metasummary ScienceDaily -- the Internet's premier science news web site -- brings you the latest discoveries in science, health & medicine, the environment, space, technology, and computers, from the world's leading universities and research institutions. Updated several times a day, Science Daily also offers free search of its archive of more than 80,000 stories, as well as related articles, images, videos, books, and journal references in hundreds of different topics, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, and more.



Infection biology: Staying a step ahead of the game  

Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness, evades the immune system by repeatedly altering the structure of its surface coat. Sequencing of its genome and studies of its 3D genome architecture have now revealed crucial molecular aspects of this strategy.

what do you think?

2018-10-18 10:53:43



Extremely small magnetic nanostructures with invisibility cloak imaged  

In novel concepts of magnetic data storage, it is intended to send small magnetic bits back and forth in a chip structure, store them densely packed and read them out later. The magnetic stray field generates problems when trying to generate particularly tiny bits. Now, researchers were able to put an 'invisibility cloak' over the magnetic structures. In this fashion, the magnetic stray field can be reduced in a fashion allowing for small yet mobile bits.

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2018-10-18 10:53:40



Biological invisibility cloak: Elucidating cuttlefish camouflage  

Computational image analysis of behaving cuttlefish reveals principles of control and development of a biological invisibility cloak.

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2018-10-18 10:53:37



How plants bind their green pigment chlorophyll  

Water-soluble protein helps to understand the photosynthetic apparatus.

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2018-10-18 10:53:25



Big-picture approach to understanding cancer will speed new treatments  

The new approach lets scientists examine the cumulative effect of multiple gene mutations, providing a much more complete picture of cancers' causes.

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2018-10-18 10:53:19



Pathogens may evade immune response with metal-free enzyme required for DNA replication  

A new study shows that some bacterial pathogens, including those that cause strep throat and pneumonia, are able to create the components necessary to replicate their DNA using a ribonucleotide reductase enzyme that does not require a metal ion cofactor.

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2018-10-18 10:53:16



Climate stress will make cities more vulnerable  

The fall of Angkor has long puzzled historians, archaeologists and scientists, but now a research team is one step closer to discovering what led to the city's demise -- and it comes with a warning for modern urban communities.

what do you think?

2018-10-18 09:54:35



Did eating starchy foods give humans an evolutionary advantage?  

Gene AMY1, which kickstarts digestion of starch in the mouth, is associated with blood glucose levels and digestion of carbohydrates, with implications for understanding human evolutionary biology and the gut microbiome.

what do you think?

2018-10-18 09:54:32



Gene-edited zebrafish models take disease research to the next level  

The potent combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and zebrafish as a model organism offers enormous potential for research into human diseases caused by point mutations. Three new articles use zebrafish to explore how advances in CRISPR/Cas9 optimization offer a new level of accuracy and specificity previously out of reach for research into this type of human genetic disorder.

what do you think?

2018-10-18 09:54:14



Adding flavors to e-cigarette liquids changes chemistry, creates irritants  

New research shows added flavorings in e-cigarettes or vaping devices react to e-liquid, or e-juice, creating new compounds that could trigger irritation and inflammation when inhaled.

what do you think?

2018-10-18 09:54:11



Mice need a clutch to smell  

Researchers identify shootin 1b as a clutch molecule that couples force and adhesion for the migration of neurons to the mouse olfactory bulb. The study provides new insights on how internal forces are converted into external movement and on how mechanical interactions regulate neurodevelopment.

what do you think?

2018-10-18 09:54:09



University choice and achievement partly down to DNA  

Research has shown for the first time that genetics plays a significant role in whether young adults choose to go to university, which university they choose to attend and how well they do.

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2018-10-18 09:54:06



Carbon fiber can store energy in the body of a vehicle  

A study has shown that carbon fibers can work as battery electrodes, storing energy directly. This opens up new opportunities for structural batteries, where the carbon fiber becomes part of the energy system. The use of this type of multifunctional material can contribute to a significant weight-reduction in the aircraft and vehicles of the future -- a key challenge for electrification.

what do you think?

2018-10-18 08:27:02



Children with autism, developmental delays nearly 50 percent more likely to be overweight, obese  

A new study reveals that children with developmental delays, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), are up to 50 percent more likely to be overweight or obese compared with the general population.

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2018-10-18 08:26:57



Biodiversity can also destabilize ecosystems  

According to the prevailing opinion, species-rich ecosystems are more stable against environmental disruptions such as drought, hot spells or pesticides. The situation is not as simple as it seems, however, as ecologists have now discovered. Under certain environmental conditions, increased biodiversity can also lead to an ecosystem becoming more unstable.

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2018-10-18 08:26:47



Sculpting bacteria into extreme shapes reveals the rugged nature of cell division  

Stars, triangles and pentagons demonstrate the adaptability and robustness of bacterial cell division machinery.

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2018-10-18 08:26:45



New approach for controlling dengue fever and Zika virus  

To be able to reproduce and become effective disease carriers, mosquitoes must first attain optimal body size and nutritional status. A pair of researchers have succeeded in using CRISPR-Cas9, a powerful tool for altering DNA sequences and modifying gene function, to decrease mosquito body size, moving the research one step closer to eliminating mosquitoes that carry dengue fever and Zika virus.

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2018-10-17 21:17:09



Hormone alters male brain networks to enhance sexual and emotional function  

Scientists have gained new insights into how the 'master regulator' of reproduction affects men's brains.

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2018-10-17 21:17:06



Letting the sunshine in may kill dust-dwelling bacteria  

Allowing sunlight in through windows can kill bacteria that live in dust.

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2018-10-17 21:17:03



Genome sequencing found feasible and informative for pediatric cancer treatment  

Comprehensive genetic testing of tumors and non-cancerous tissue from pediatric cancer patients is a feasible and clinically useful approach that can guide patient care, according to new findings.

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2018-10-17 21:17:00



Ancient Andean genomes show distinct adaptations to farming and altitude  

Ancient populations in the Andes of Peru adapted to their high-altitude environment and the introduction of agriculture in ways distinct from other global populations that faced similar circumstances.

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2018-10-17 21:16:57



Experts raise safety concerns about cardboard baby boxes  

Cardboard baby boxes are being promoted for infant sleep as a safe alternative to more traditional cots, bassinets, or Moses baskets, without any evidence in place, warn experts.

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2018-10-17 18:49:59



Omega 3 fatty acids found in seafood linked to healthy aging  

Higher blood levels of omega 3 fatty acids found in seafood are associated with a higher likelihood of healthy ageing among older adults, finds a US study published by The BMJ today.

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2018-10-17 18:49:56



Pre-eclampsia linked to an increased risk of dementia later in life  

Pre-eclampsia is associated with an increased risk of later dementia, particularly vascular dementia, caused by reduced blood supply to the brain due to diseased blood vessels, finds a large study.

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2018-10-17 18:49:53



US tornado frequency shifting eastward from Great Plains  

A new study finds that over the past four decades, tornado frequency has increased over a large swath of the Midwest and Southeast and decreased in portions of the central and southern Great Plains, a region traditionally associated with Tornado Alley.

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2018-10-17 17:28:46



Arctic greening thaws permafrost, boosts runoff  

A new collaborative study has investigated Arctic shrub-snow interactions to obtain a better understanding of the far north's tundra and vast permafrost system. Incorporating extensive in situ observations, scientists tested their theories with a novel 3D computer model and confirmed that shrubs can lead to significant degradation of the permafrost layer that has remained frozen for tens of thousands of years. These interactions are driving increases in discharges of fresh water into rivers, lak

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2018-10-17 17:28:41



Largest autism sequencing study to date yields 102 genes associated with ASD  

In the largest genetic sequencing study of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to date, researchers have identified 102 genes associated with ASD, and report significant progress toward teasing apart the genes associated with ASD from those associated with intellectual disability and developmental delay, conditions between which there is often overlap.

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2018-10-17 17:28:38



Simple test may help predict long-term outcome after stroke  

A simple test taken within a week of a stroke may help predict how well people will have recovered up to three years later.

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2018-10-17 17:28:35



Eliminating emissions in India and China could add years to people's lives  

In a recent study, researchers wanted to know how replacing coal-fired powerplants in China and India with clean, renewable energy could benefit human health and save lives in the future. The researchers found that eliminating harmful emissions from powerplants could save an estimated annual 15 million years of life in China and 11 million years of life in India.

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2018-10-17 17:28:32



A 150-year-old drug might improve radiation therapy for cancer  

A drug first identified 150 years ago and used as a smooth-muscle relaxant might make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. Researchers found that the drug papaverine inhibits the respiration of mitochondria, the oxygen-consuming and energy-making components of cells, and sensitizes model tumors to radiation. They found that the drug does not affect the radiation sensitivity of well-oxygenated normal tissues.

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2018-10-17 17:28:29



Conceptual framework to study role of exercise in multiple sclerosis  

Researchers have proposed a conceptual framework for examining the relationship between exercise and adaptive neuroplasticity in the population with multiple sclerosis (MS).

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2018-10-17 14:53:23



First GWAS analysis of 'type 1.5 diabetes' reveals links between immune and metabolic disease  

Scientists who performed the largest-ever genetic study of a puzzling type of adult-onset diabetes have uncovered new connections to the two major types of diabetes, offering intriguing insights into more accurate diagnosis and better treatment. Latent automimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a relatively common disorder that shares features of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 14:53:20



How does brain structure influence performance on language tasks?  

The architecture of each person's brain is unique, and differences may influence how quickly people can complete various cognitive tasks. But how neuroanatomy impacts performance is largely an open question. To learn more, scientists are developing a new tool -- computational models of the brain -- to simulate how the structure of the brain may impact brain activity and, ultimately, human behavior.

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2018-10-17 14:21:40



Stem cell proliferation is controlled directly by nervous system, scientists find  

A new study demonstrates that stem cell proliferation is directly controlled by the autonomic nervous system.

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2018-10-17 14:10:33



Wind farms and reducing hurricane precipitation  

New research reveals an unexpected benefit of large-scale offshore wind farms: the ability to lessen precipitation from hurricanes.

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2018-10-17 14:10:24



Massive organism is crashing on our watch  

Researchers have conducted the first complete assessment of the Pando aspen clone and the results show continuing deterioration of this 'forest of one tree.' While a portion of the famed grove is recovery nicely as a result of previous restoration, the majority of Pando (Latin for 'I Spread') is diminishing by attrition.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 14:10:20



Life on the floor of the Arctic Ocean, with rigor and in detail  

In an extensive and rigorous study of animal life on the Central Arctic Ocean floor, researchers have shown that water depth and food availability influence the species composition, density, and biomass of benthic communities.

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2018-10-17 14:10:11



Immune culprits linked to inflammation and bone loss in gum disease identified  

An unhealthy population of microbes in the mouth triggers specialized immune cells that inflame and destroy tissues, leading to the type of bone loss associated with a severe form of gum disease, according to a new study in mice and humans. The findings could have implications for new treatment approaches for the condition.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 14:10:02



Vast leukemia dataset could help researchers match therapies to patients  

Data on the molecular makeup and drug sensitivity of hundreds of patient samples could accelerate progress against the aggressive blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia.

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2018-10-17 14:09:56



Virtual reality can help make people more compassionate compared to other media  

Researchers found that people who underwent a virtual reality experience, called 'Becoming Homeless,' were more empathetic toward the homeless and more likely to sign a petition in support of affordable housing than other study participants.

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2018-10-17 14:09:52



Picture perfect: Researchers gain clearest ever image of Ebola virus protein  

Near-atomic resolution model of viral protein complex brings clearer understanding of the viral mechanics.

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2018-10-17 14:09:45



Dandelion seeds reveal newly discovered form of natural flight  

A study of dandelion seeds in motion has revealed a form of flight not seen before, and explains why the plant is among nature's best fliers.

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2018-10-17 14:09:42



Pupil's brain recognizes the perfect teacher  

Human and avian youngsters learn behaviors by imitating adults. But learners are selective in who they copy, and scientists don't understand how they choose the right teacher. Young male zebra finches must learn to copy the song of an adult male to mate, but juveniles won't imitate songs played through a loudspeaker or sung by other species of birds. New findings show how the juvenile birds identify the right teacher.

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2018-10-17 14:09:33



Combining genetic and sun exposure data improves skin cancer risk estimates  

By combining data on individuals' lifetime sun exposure and their genetics, researchers can generate improved predictions of their risk of skin cancer.

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2018-10-17 14:09:31



Unprecedented look at electron: Size limit for undiscovered subatomic particles determined  

A new study suggests that many theorized heavy particles, if they exist at all, do not have the properties needed to explain the predominance of matter over antimatter in the universe. If confirmed, the findings would force significant revisions to several prominent theories posed as alternatives to the Standard Model of particle physics, which was developed in the early 1970s.

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2018-10-17 14:09:28



Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current  

Scientists have now identified a key mechanism, which they call the 'ice-ocean governor,' that controls how fast the Beaufort Gyre spins and how much fresh water it stores. Researchers report that the Arctic's ice cover essentially sets a speed limit on the gyre's spin.

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2018-10-17 14:09:25



Bacterioplankton: Taking their vitamins  

New research finds that more bacterioplankton utilize vitamin B1 or B1 precursors from their environment than synthesize their own. The researchers also found that B1 availability can directly limit bacterioplankton growth, which could have larger impacts on aquatic microbial food webs, as well as energy and nutrient exchange.

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2018-10-17 12:44:51



Substantial changes in air pollution across China during 2015 to 2017  

The first detailed analysis of air pollution trends in China reveals a 20 per cent drop in concentrations of particulate pollution over the last three years (2015-2017).

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2018-10-17 12:44:48



Bone cell response to mechanical force is balance of injury and repair  

Scientists have revealed the intricate process that bone cells use to repair themselves after mechanical injury.

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2018-10-17 11:10:46



Astronomers find a cosmic Titan in the early universe  

Astronomers have discovered a titanic structure in the early universe, just two billion years after the Big Bang. This galaxy proto-supercluster, nicknamed Hyperion, is the largest and most massive structure yet found at such a remote time and distance.

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2018-10-17 11:10:36



Bursting the clouds for better communication  

We live in an age of long-range information. Research is turning towards the use of lasers which have several advantages. However, this new technology faces a major problem: clouds. Due to their density, clouds stop the laser beams and scramble the transfer of information. Researchers have now devised an ultra-hot laser that creates a temporary hole in the cloud, which lets the laser beam containing the information pass through.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:33



3D-printed lithium-ion batteries  

Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially available batteries. But researchers have developed a new method to 3D print lithium-ion batteries in virtually any shape.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:30



Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time  

Moss, one of the world's oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it. Now scientists report that they have found a simple and inexpensive way to detect air pollutants, specifically sulfur dioxide, in real time based on subtle changes in moss leaves. The discovery could rapidly alert authorities to potentially dangerous alterations in air quality using a sustainable, natural plant sensor.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:27



Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney  

There just aren't enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kidney with the potential to make dialysis more convenient, comfortable and effective.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:25



World Heritage Sites threatened by rising sea levels  

In the Mediterranean region, there are numerous UNESCO World Heritage Sites in low-lying coastal areas. In the course of the 21st century, these sites will increasingly be at risk by storm surges and increasing coastal erosion due to sea-level rise.

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2018-10-17 11:10:22



Selfish people have fewer children and earn less money  

What happens to those who behave unselfishly and make sacrifices for the sake of others? According to an interdisciplinary study, unselfish people tend both to have more children and to receive higher salaries, in comparison to more selfish people.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:19



Regulating microglial activity may reduce inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases  

A group of investigators is proposing that targeting immune checkpoints -- molecules that regulate the activity of the immune system -- in immune cells called microglia could reduce the inflammatory aspects of important neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:16



Double dust ring test could spot migrating planets  

Astrophysicist now have a way of finally telling whether newly forming planets are migrating within the disc of dust and gas that typically surrounds stars or whether they are simply staying put in the same orbit around the star.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:14



New imaging tool captures how sound moves through the chinchilla ear  

Researchers have developed a new device that can be used to visualize how sound-induced vibrations travel through the ear.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:11



Breastfeeding protects infants from antibiotic-resistant bacteria  

A new study shows that infants that are breastfed for at least six months have less antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their gut compared with babies breastfed for a shorter time. On the other hand, antibiotic use by mothers increases the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in infants.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:06



Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think  

Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to new findings, having sex with an ex doesn't seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true even for those who continue to pine for their ex.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:03



Attending the 'best' high school may yield benefits and risks for students  

Parents often go to great lengths to ensure that their children attend top schools, surrounded by high-achieving peers who often come from advantaged backgrounds. But data collected from individuals over a span of 50 years suggests that these aspects of selective schools aren't uniformly beneficial to students' educational and professional outcomes in the following decades.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:10:00



A curious branch of plankton evolution  

Planktonic foraminifera -- tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea -- left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively sturdy grasp on when and how new lineages arose. However, a new study reveals that one lineage evolved much more rapidly than everyone predicted, and researchers are looking beyond Darwin's original theories of gradual evolution to understand why.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 11:09:50



Blue crab baby sizes and shapes influence their survival  

Like people, blue crabs aren't all the same sizes and shapes. Now scientists have discovered substantial differences in the body structures of larval crab siblings and among larvae from different mothers. And that can mean the difference between an early death and survival into adulthood for this important commercial and recreational species.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 09:49:43



Plant hormone makes space farming a possibility  

With scarce nutrients and weak gravity, growing potatoes on the Moon or on other planets seems unimaginable. But the plant hormone strigolactone could make it possible, plant biologists have shown. The hormone supports the symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, thus encouraging plants' growth -- even under the challenging conditions found in space.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 09:49:40



Societies can remain distinct despite migration  

Countries around the world can retain distinct cultures despite migration, new research shows.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 09:49:35



Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect  

The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when a penis-like structure in the female anchors in the male 'vagina.'

what do you think?

2018-10-17 09:24:44



Electrical enhancement: Engineers speed up electrons in semiconductors  

Researchers have sped up the movement of electrons in organic semiconductor films by two to three orders of magnitude. The speedier electronics could lead to improved solar power and transistor use across the world, according to the scientists.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 09:24:41



Participating in sports during childhood may have long-term benefits for bone health  

Participation in organized sport during childhood and adolescence is associated with bone mass at 20 years of age.

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2018-10-17 08:08:19



Winter ticks killing moose at alarming rate  

Researchers have found that the swell of infestations of winter ticks -- which attach themselves to moose during the fall and feed throughout the winter -- is the primary cause of an unprecedented 70 percent death rate of calves over a three-year period.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 08:08:14



Supermassive black holes and supercomputers  

The universe's deep past is beyond the reach of even the mighty Hubble Space Telescope. But a new review explains how creation of the first stars and galaxies is nevertheless being mapped in detail, with the aid of computer simulations and theoretical models -- and how a new generation of supercomputers and software is being built that will fill in the gaps.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 08:08:07



Controlling organic semiconductor band gaps by electron-acceptor fluorination  

Researchers synthesized a fluorinated electron-acceptor for use in organic semiconductors. The high electronegativity of the fluorine substituents enhanced the electron-accepting properties of the widely used electron-acceptor. The power conversion efficiency of a thin film solar cell based on the fluorinated product was shown to be significantly higher than that of a cell containing an unmodified analogue. The synthesized material could be applied in thin film organic solar cell devices.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 08:08:05



Nutrition has a greater impact on bone strength than exercise  

One question that scientists and fitness experts alike would love to answer is whether exercise or nutrition has a bigger positive impact on bone strength.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 08:08:02



Penetrating the soil's surface with radar  

Ground penetrating radar measures the amount of moisture in soil quickly and easily. Researchers' calculations from the data informs agricultural water use and climate models.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 08:07:57



Paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm  

Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants. How these effects are transmitted across generations, however, remains mysterious. A new study in the roundworm C. elegans documents the transmission via sperm of epigenetic marks that are both necessary and sufficient to guide proper development of germ cells in the offspring.

what do you think?

2018-10-17 08:07:54



Sex or food? Decision-making in single-cell organisms  

Unicellular diatoms are able to adapt their behavior to different external stimuli based on an evaluation of their own needs. In experiments, Seminavis robusta diatoms directed their orientation either towards nutrient sources or mating partners, depending on the degree of starvation and the need to mate.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 15:42:41



New understanding of Mekong River incision  

An international team of earth scientists has linked the establishment of the Mekong River to a period of major intensification of the Asian monsoon during the middle Miocene, about 17 million years ago, findings that supplant the assumption that the river incised in response to tectonic causes.

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2018-10-16 15:42:37



The science of sustainability  

Can humans drive economic growth, meet rising demand for food, energy and water, and make significant environmental progress? The short answer is 'yes,' but it comes with several big 'ifs.' New research shows that we can put the world on a path to sustainability if we make significant changes within the next 10 years.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 15:42:34



New method to address deep-seated biases in science  

A new statistical method that tests for equivalence, rather than difference, has a role to play in dismantling gender and publication biases in science. The authors believe the technique has broad applicability across disciplines and can help remove publication bias against ''negative results,'' opening the door to a broader investigation of natural phenomena.

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2018-10-16 15:07:25



Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park  

Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal human intervention. The new study is a synthesis of 40 years of research on large mammals in Yellowstone National Park.

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2018-10-16 15:07:22



Antarctic ice shelf 'sings' as winds whip across its surface  

Winds blowing across snow dunes on Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf cause the massive ice slab's surface to vibrate, producing a near-constant set of seismic 'tones' scientists could potentially use to monitor changes in the ice shelf from afar, according to new research.

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2018-10-16 15:06:54



When it comes to smartphone lifespan, brand name matters more than hardware  

The environmental costs of smartphones are often exacerbated by the relatively short lifespans of these globally ubiquitous devices. When it comes to extending the lifespan of these products, brand name might be more important than repairability, a new study finds.

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2018-10-16 14:24:34



Renewable energy is common ground for Democrats and Republicans  

While conservatives and liberals tend to disagree on many environmental issues, they both view the development of solar power and other forms of renewable energy as financially savvy and a step towards self-sufficiency.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 14:24:31



Research assesses geographic distribution of new antibiotics following market introduction  

New study finds that between 1999 and 2014, only 25 new antibiotics entered the global market. The majority of antibiotics released in this time period originated from Japanese or US companies and were launched in Japan or the US. Of the 25 antibiotics, 18 treat community-acquired respiratory infections, 14 treat skin infections, and 12 treat urinary infections. Half treat infections caused by resistant bacteria, but none targeted Gram-negative bacteria, which cause most untreatable infections.

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2018-10-16 14:24:26



Father's nicotine use can cause cognitive problems in children and grandchildren  

A father's exposure to nicotine may cause cognitive deficits in his children and even grandchildren, according to a new study. The effect, which was not caused by direct secondhand exposure, may be due to epigenetic changes in key genes in the father's sperm.

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2018-10-16 14:24:22



Lymphatic system, key player in human health  

Defects in the lymphatic system have been linked to a wide range of health consequences, but new findings of how the system works could lead to future therapies.

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2018-10-16 13:20:41



New, durable catalyst for key fuel cell reaction may prove useful in eco-friendly vehicles  

A new catalyst exceeds Department of Energy targets for performing the oxygen reduction reaction, a key step in generating an electric current in a hydrogen fuel cell.

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2018-10-16 13:20:35



Climate models fail to simulate recent air-pressure changes over Greenland  

Climatologists may be unable to accurately predict regional climate change over the North Atlantic because computer simulations have failed to include real data from the Greenland region over the last three decades -- and it could lead to regional climate predictions for the UK and parts of Europe being inaccurate.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:20:32



Looking and listening for signals of navy test explosions off Florida coast  

Underwater explosions detonated by the US Navy to test the sturdiness of ships' hulls have provided seismologists with a test opportunity of their own: how much can we know about an underwater explosion from the seismic and acoustic data it generates?

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:20:30



All in the family: Kin of gravitational wave source discovered  

According to new research, an object named GRB150101B -- first reported as a gamma-ray burst in 2015 -- shares remarkable similarities with GW170817, the neutron star merger discovered by LIGO and observed by multiple light-gathering telescopes in 2017. The new analysis suggests that these two separate objects may in fact be directly related.

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2018-10-16 13:20:24



Modifiable dementia risk factor in older adults identified  

Stiffness of the aorta -- more so than blood pressure or subclinical brain disease -- is a key risk factor for dementia. Since aortic stiffness can be reduced by medication and healthy lifestyle changes, these results suggest that people can still lower their dementia risk well into old age.

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2018-10-16 13:20:21



Are trigger warnings emotionally protective?  

Do you like to see warnings about violent or other distressing content before watching a TV show or movie, or reading a book?

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2018-10-16 13:20:14



Public opinion on GMOs might impact similar technologies in stores  

Researchers have found that an individual's perception of genetically modified organisms might impact their judgments about whether or not nanotechnology-enabled products should be labeled in stores.

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2018-10-16 13:20:12



Simple stickers may save lives of patients, athletes and lower medical costs  

Researchers have created wearable medical electronic devices that someone can easily attach to their skin. The devices are made out of paper to lower the cost of personalized medicine.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:20:09



No sweat required: Hypertension treatment mimics effect of exercise  

By studying a chemical produced predominately in the liver, hypertension researchers have found a novel approach to lower blood pressure, even without reducing sodium intake or increasing exercise.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:20:06



Environmental factors may trigger onset of multiple sclerosis  

A new study finds that certain environmental conditions like salt concentrations and temperature may precipitate structural changes that take place in myelin sheaths in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin sheaths are the 'insulating tape' surrounding axons; axons carry electrical impulses in neurons.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:20:03



Infants are more likely to learn when with a peer  

Researchers looked at the mechanisms involved in language learning among nine-month-olds, the youngest population known to be studied in relation to on-screen learning.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:20:00



Youth violence lower in countries with complete ban on corporal punishment  

A study shows that in countries where there is a complete ban on all corporal punishment of children there is less fighting among young people. There was 31 percent less physical fighting in young men and 42 percent less physical fighting in young women in countries where corporal punishment was banned in all settings, compared with those where corporal punishment was permitted both at school and at home. In countries where there was a partial ban on corporal punishment (such as in Canada, the U

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:19:58



Population aging and decrease may have socioeconomic and environmental benefits  

Environmental scientists argue that societies should embrace population aging and decrease. They cite multiple reports of the socioeconomic and environmental benefits of population aging, mortality-related decrease, and shrinking workforces due to retirement and maintain that, contrary to some economic analyses, costs associated with aging societies are manageable, while smaller populations make for more sustainable societies.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:19:52



Climate changes require better adaptation to drought  

Europe's future climate will be characterized by more frequent heat waves and more widespread drought. Heat and drought will both challenge crop production, but drought in particular will be a problem -- especially for spring sown crops such as maize.

what do you think?

2018-10-16 13:19:50






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