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Science Daily: News Articles in Science, Health, Environment Technology

Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate environment, computers, engineering, health medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations. id=metasummary ScienceDaily -- the Internet's premier science news web site -- brings you the latest discoveries in science, health & medicine, the environment, space, technology, and computers, from the world's leading universities and research institutions. Updated several times a day, Science Daily also offers free search of its archive of more than 80,000 stories, as well as related articles, images, videos, books, and journal references in hundreds of different topics, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, and more.



Stem cell researchers develop promising technique to generate new muscle cells in lab  

To help patients with muscle disorders, scientists have engineered a new stem cell line to study the conversion of stem cells into muscle.

what do you think?

2018-12-12 20:08:09



Researchers design technology that sees nerve cells fire  

Researchers have created a noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire based on changes in shape. The method could be used to observe nerve activity in light-accessible parts of the body, such as the eye, which would allow physicians to quantitatively monitor visual function at the cellular level.

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2018-12-12 20:08:06



Blood test could lead to cystic fibrosis treatment tailored to each patient  

Researchers have used a blood test and microarray technology to identify distinct molecular signatures in children with cystic fibrosis. These patterns of gene expression ultimately could help predict disease severity and treatment response, and lead to therapies tailored to each patient's precise biology.

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2018-12-12 20:08:03



Ritalin drives greater connection between brain areas key to memory, attention  

Scientists have described increased connections between key parts of the brains of monkeys who have taken methylphenidate (Ritalin).

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2018-12-12 20:08:00



Barely scratching the surface: A new way to make robust membranes  

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique's viability for membranes.

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2018-12-12 20:07:57



Tiny tech tracks hummingbirds at urban feeders  

Urban hummingbird feeders are highly prevalent. Researchers want to understand the health implications for birds congregating and sharing food resources at these bird buffets. Data from a new study using RFID technology is one piece of that puzzle.

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2018-12-12 20:07:49



Excess body weight responsible for nearly 4 percent of cancers worldwide  

Excess body weight accounted for approximately 3.9 percent of all cancers worldwide in 2012, a figure that is expected to rise in the coming decades given current trends.

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2018-12-12 20:07:46



3D-printed reconstructions provide clues to ancient site  

Part of the ancient archaeological site of Tiwanaku, Bolivia, believed by Incans to be where the world was created has been reconstructed using 3D printed models of fragments of an ancient building.

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2018-12-12 20:07:43



How unconventional metals behave, with an eye on high-temperature superconductors  

By trapping atoms in a lattice of light, researchers explore how unconventional metals conduct electricity, with an eye toward understanding high-temperature superconductors.

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2018-12-12 16:01:24



How deep learning is bringing automatic cloud detection to new heights  

Can deep learning -- a distinct subset of machine learning -- do a better job at identifying clouds in lidar data than the current physics-based algorithms? The answer: A clear 'yes.' A new model is much closer to the answers scientists arrive at but in just a fraction of the time.

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2018-12-12 16:01:16



Fishery length, angler effort: How they relate  

A new study suggests reducing the number of fishing days in a season doesn't reduce catch as much as some would predict.

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2018-12-12 16:01:03



Cardinals living in adjacent deserts are sharply distinct in genetics and song  

New research suggests that populations of the Northern Cardinal -- one of the most ubiquitous backyard birds in the United States -- are undergoing speciation in two adjacent deserts. This study, which analyzed genetics and vocal behavior, gives clues about the early steps in bird speciation.

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2018-12-12 15:59:11



Helping the anti-parasitic medicine go down  

An international team has developed a novel pharmaceutical formulation to administer triclabendazole -- an anti-parasitic drug used to treat a type of flatworm infection -- in billions of tiny capsules.

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2018-12-12 14:46:40



Large population of potential young planets found in distant planetary systems  

Astronomers used the powerful ALMA telescope to discover that in other parts of the Milky Way Galaxy (seen here) there is potentially a large population of young planets -- similar in mass to Neptune or Jupiter -- at wide-orbit that are not detectable by other current planet searching techniques.

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2018-12-12 14:46:31



Climate change imperils Midwest ag production  

A new study shows that Midwest agriculture is increasingly vulnerable to climate change because of the region's reliance on growing rain-fed crops.

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2018-12-12 14:46:25



Umbilical cord blood metal levels in newborns  

New findings reveal urban and rural differences in prenatal exposure to essential and toxic elements.

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2018-12-12 14:46:20



NASA's Juno mission halfway to Jupiter science  

On Dec. 21, NASA's Juno spacecraft will be 3,140 miles (5,053 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops and hurtling by at a healthy clip of 128,802 mph (207,287 kilometers per hour). This will mark the solar-powered spacecraft's halfway point in data collection during its prime mission.

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2018-12-12 14:42:01



NASA's InSight takes its first selfie  

NASA's InSight lander used a camera on its robotic arm to take its first selfie -- a mosaic made up of 11 images. This is the same imaging process used by NASA's Curiosity rover mission, in which many overlapping pictures are taken and later stitched together.

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2018-12-12 14:39:31



Length of eye blinks might act as conversational cue  

Blinking may feel like an unconscious activity, but new research suggests that humans unknowingly perceive eye blinks as nonverbal cues when engaging in conversation.

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2018-12-12 14:07:46



First-ever look at complete skeleton of Thylacoleo, Australia's extinct 'marsupial lion'  

Thyalacoleo carnifex, the 'marsupial lion' of Pleistocene Australia, was an adept hunter that got around with the help of a strong tail, according to a new study. These insights come after newly discovered remains, including one nearly complete fossil specimen, allowed these researchers to reconstruct this animal's entire skeleton for the first time.

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2018-12-12 14:07:43



Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find  

In 2016, Seattle Public Schools pushed back start times for its 18 high schools by 55 minutes. Researchers have now announced that, as a result, teens at two Seattle high schools got more sleep on school nights -- a median increase of 34 minutes of sleep each night -- and showed improved attendance and grades.

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2018-12-12 14:07:41



DNA study shows stethoscopes loaded with bacteria, including staphylococcus  

Stethoscopes carried by health care practitioners are loaded with diverse bacteria, including some that can cause healthcare-associated infections, according to a study. The research also reviewed the effectiveness of cleaning methods, finding a standardized approach to be superior for removing bacteria compared with various approaches employed by health care practitioners.

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2018-12-12 13:50:44



Obtaining polyester from plant oil  

Chemists have developed a new catalysis concept for obtaining polyester from castor oil.

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2018-12-12 13:50:38



More 'heatwave' summers will affect animals  

Heatwaves similar to those experienced in Europe in 2018 can have a very negative impact on animals. A new study shows that overheated birds have smaller offspring, and that those that are born may have lower chances of survival.

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2018-12-12 13:50:36



How bullying affects the structure of the teen brain  

The effects of constantly being bullied are more than just psychological. Research now shows that there may be physical structural differences in the brains of adolescents who are regularly victimized, and this could increase the chance that they suffer from mental illness.

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2018-12-12 13:50:32



Bose-Einstein condensates cannot currently detect gravitational waves  

The gravitational waves created in the depths of space indeed reach Earth. Their effects, however, are so small that they could only be observed so far using kilometer-long measurement facilities. Physicists therefore discuss whether Bose-Einstein condensates with their ordered quantum properties could also detect these waves. Astronomers have now looked at these suggestions and have soberly determined that such evidence is far beyond the reach of current methods.

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2018-12-12 13:50:30



Subway train travel linked to spread of flu-like illnesses  

Despite the commuter cold being a widely accepted concept, it has never been proven that public transport contributes to the spread of airborne infections. Now new research on the London underground commute has proven a link does exist.

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2018-12-12 13:50:27



Crashes increase when speed limits dip far below engineering recommendation  

Speed limits set only five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produce a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to a group of researchers.

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2018-12-12 13:50:21



Resting easy: Oxygen promotes deep, restorative sleep  

Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study.

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2018-12-12 13:44:32



Scientists identify new minerals for carbon capture  

Research confirms new minerals are capturing and storing carbon. The minerals, members of the hydrotalcite group, are the first outside of the carbonate family to naturally capture atmospheric CO2 in mine waste, important as society continues to forge ways to lower our carbon emissions and combat climate change.

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2018-12-12 13:44:30



Clearest view ever of cell membrane yields unexpected structure, research possibilities  

Scientists have gained the clearest view yet of a patch of cell membrane and its components, revealing unexpected structures and opening up new possibilities for pharmaceutical research.

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2018-12-12 13:44:27



Earth's cobalt deposits formed much later than previously believed  

Cobalt deposits in the Democratic Republic of Congo, one of Earth's largest cobalt-mining regions, are 150 million years younger than previously thought, according to a new study. The study provides critical insight into exploration for cobalt, an important component in rechargeable batteries.

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2018-12-12 13:44:24



Record levels of mercury released by thawing permafrost in Canadian Arctic  

Permafrost thaw slumps in the western Canadian Arctic are releasing record amounts of mercury into waterways, according to new research by University of Alberta ecologists.

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2018-12-12 13:44:16



Professor models system using baking soda filled capsules to capture CO2 emissions  

Coal and natural gas represent the majority of the US energy supply. Even with pollution controls, burning these fossil fuels for energy releases a tremendous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Research uses microcapsule technology that may make post-combustion carbon capture cheaper, safer, and more efficient.

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2018-12-12 13:44:13



Clue to epidemics in 'bursty' social behavior  

Researchers have developed a mathematical model that could cure the potential to underestimate how quickly diseases spread. The team discovered that current predictive models may miss the influence of a critical aspect of the social behavior of individuals called 'burstiness.'

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2018-12-12 13:44:10



Biologists shed new light on an old question  

For nearly 100 years biologists have argued about how exactly natural selection can possibly work. If nature selects the individuals with the best genes then why aren't all organisms the same? What maintains the genetic variation that natural selection acts upon, the genetic variation that has ultimately led to the spectacular diversity of life on Earth today? Recent findings suggest that the answer could be sex.

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2018-12-12 13:44:07



Rice plants that grow as clones from seed  

Plant biologists have discovered a way to make crop plants replicate through seeds as clones. The discovery, long sought by plant breeders and geneticists, could make it easier to propagate high-yielding, disease-resistant or climate-tolerant crops and make them available to the world's farmers.

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2018-12-12 13:43:59



Unlocking the secrets of how cells communicate offers insights into treating diseases  

Researchers have made a significant breakthrough by developing the 3D structure of proteins from inside the eye lens that control how cells communicate with each other, which could open the door to treating diseases such as cataracts, stroke and cancer.

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2018-12-12 13:43:57



Why deep oceans gave life to the first big, complex organisms  

Why did the first big, complex organisms spring to life in deep, dark oceans where food was scarce? A new study finds great depths provided a stable, life-sustaining refuge from wild temperature swings in the shallows.

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2018-12-12 13:43:54



The epoch of planet formation, times twenty  

A team of astronomers has conducted ALMA's first large-scale, high-resolution survey of protoplanetary disks, the belts of dust and gas around young stars.

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2018-12-12 13:43:52



Hearing loss is a risk factor for premature death  

A new study links hearing loss with an increased risk for mortality before the age of 75 due to cardiovascular disease. Researchers found that mortality among those with hearing loss is elevated, particularly among men and women younger than age 75 and those who are divorced or separated. However, mortality risk was diminished in adults with a well-hearing partner. This is the first study to investigate the combined effects of hearing loss with partnership, parental status, and increased mortali

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2018-12-12 12:19:11



Gut hormone increases response to food  

The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging overeating and obesity.

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2018-12-12 12:19:07



Scientists pave the way for saliva test for Alzheimer's disease  

Scientists have identified three biomarkers for detecting mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease in saliva samples. The research has promising results for application in a clinical setting.

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2018-12-12 12:19:04



Rethinking school suspensions: School climate offers a clue  

Researchers have found that when educators and administrators focus on creating a positive school climate, the likelihood of a student being suspended decreases by approximately 10 percent.

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2018-12-12 12:19:01



Record-wet and record-dry months increased in regions worldwide  

More and more rainfall extremes are observed in regions around the globe -- triggering both wet and dry records, a new study shows. Yet there are big differences between regions: The central and Eastern US, northern Europe and northern Asia have experienced heavy rainfall events that have led to severe floods in recent past. In contrast, most African regions have seen an increased frequency of months with a lack of rain.

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2018-12-12 12:18:57



Coral larvae use sound to find a home on the reef  

A new study is starting to unravel that mystery. Researchers found that the soundscape of a reef -- the combined sounds of all animals living nearby -- might play a major role in steering corals towards healthy reef systems and away from damaged ones.

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2018-12-12 12:18:53



Chickens to be marker of Anthropocene  

New research shows the age of man -- the Anthropocene -- will be defined by the chicken.

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2018-12-12 12:18:51



New research questions the 'Glass Cliff' and corroborates the persistent 'Glass Ceiling'  

Are women more likely to be appointed to leadership positions in crisis situations when companies are struggling with declining profits?

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2018-12-12 12:18:48



Low-cost catalyst boosts hydrogen production from water  

A future powered by carbon-free fuel depends on our ability to harness and store energy from renewable but intermittent sources, such as solar and wind. Now, a new catalyst gives a boost to a number of clean energy technologies that depend on producing hydrogen from water.

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2018-12-12 12:18:45



Butterflies: Fallen through the net?  

Using long-term data from the ''Butterfly Monitoring Germany'' citizens' research project, scientists have now investigated the matter using butterflies as an example. According to the research, there are more butterfly species in Natura 2000 areas than elsewhere. However, the same decline in the numbers of species regardless whether the communities are located within or outside the protected areas.

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2018-12-12 12:18:43



Students around the globe collect quality, eye-opening research data on mammals  

Researchers are running a large-scale camera-trap study called eMammal, recently enlisted the help of K-12 students from 28 schools and four countries -- the United States, India, Mexico and Kenya. What the researchers, and the kids, discovered was surprising.

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2018-12-12 12:18:40



3D printing offers helping hand to patients with arthritis  

3D printing can cut the cost of adaptive aids that help people with hand arthritis. Current products are quite expensive, and more so to create customized versions, but 3D printing drops the cost by an average of 94 percent for 20 different handheld devices.

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2018-12-12 12:18:38



Killing the liver-stage malaria parasite with baculovirus: a drug discovery approach  

Currently, few antimalarial treatments exist that effectively kill liver-stage malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax, which can lay dormant for months or even years. Researchers have reported a new drug that could eliminate liver-stage malaria parasites completely. Using an insect virus, known as a baculovirus, the researchers investigated the ability of baculovirus to mediate innate immunity against malaria infection. This work could pave the way for developing new and more effective antimalarial t

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2018-12-12 10:46:42



Deep-learning technique reveals 'invisible' objects in the dark  

Small imperfections in a wine glass or tiny creases in a contact lens can be tricky to make out, even in good light. In almost total darkness, images of such transparent features or objects are nearly impossible to decipher. But now, engineers have developed a technique that can reveal these "invisible" objects, in the dark.

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2018-12-12 10:46:39



Marketing: Putting a price on reputation  

As Christmas shopping gets into full swing, new research reveals how reputation influences our purchasing decisions and the price we are willing to pay relative to other product features.

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2018-12-12 10:46:35



Fighting obesity: Could it be as plain as dirt?  

It costs the global economy an estimated US $2 trillion annually and has been dubbed a modern day health epidemic, but new research has unearthed a possible cure for obesity -- and it is as plain as dirt!

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2018-12-12 10:46:32



The stiffest porous lightweight materials ever  

Researchers have developed and manufactured a family of architectures that maximizes the stiffness of porous lightweight materials. It's practically impossible to develop stiffer designs.

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2018-12-12 10:46:28



Light-induced modification of a carboxylic acid with an aminocyclopropenone  

Researchers report that carboxylic acids, functional groups contained in biomolecules, drugs, and materials can be readily modified by light-induced organic reactions using an aminocyclopropenone. This discovery opens up new pathways for carboxylic acid modification with potential applications including determination of drug target proteins, elucidation of protein function, and synthesis of functionalized polymer materials.

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2018-12-12 10:46:21



New foldable drone flies through narrow holes in rescue missions  

A research team has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

what do you think?

2018-12-12 10:46:18



Researchers reverse engineer way pine trees produce green chemicals worth billions  

Researchers have reverse engineered the way a pine tree produces a resin, which could serve as an environmentally friendly alternative to a range of fossil-fuel based products worth billions of dollars.

what do you think?

2018-12-12 10:46:16



Development of world's first vertical Ga2O3 transistor through ion implantation doping  

Researchers at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) demonstrate a vertical Ga2O3 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) that adopts an all-ion-implanted process for both n-type and p-type doping, paving the way for new generations of low-cost and highly-manufacturable Ga2O3 power electronic devices.

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2018-12-12 10:46:07



New method for studying ALS more effectively  

The neurodegenerative disease ALS causes motor neuron death and paralysis. However, long before the cells die, they lose contact with the muscles as their axons atrophy. Researchers have now devised a new method that radically improves the ability to study axons and thus to better understand the pathological development of ALS.

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2018-12-12 10:46:01



New model in the fight against African swine fever  

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has published a new scientific report on the current status of the spread of African swine fever within the EU. The report describes, among other things, which management measures EU member states should take if an isolated outbreak of the virus infection occurs, i.e. if it is detected far away from the current spread.

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2018-12-12 09:33:30



Your weight history may predict your heart failure risk  

In a medical records analysis of information gathered on more than 6,000 people, researchers conclude that simply asking older adult patients about their weight history at ages 20 and 40 could provide real value to clinicians in their efforts to predict patients' future risk of heart failure, heart attacks or strokes.

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2018-12-12 09:33:27



'Eavesdropping' on groupers' mating calls key to survival  

Many fish produce sounds for courtship and mating, navigation, and defending their territories. Scientists analyze these sounds to study their behavior such as reproduction. Since grouper spawning is brief and it takes them a long time to reach sexual maturity, they are vulnerable to overfishing. 'Eavesdropping' on them is key to their survival. Researchers have developed a novel acoustic monitoring technique to classify grouper species by their sounds or 'grouper calls,' with accuracy of about

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2018-12-12 09:33:23



Declining snowpack over Western US mapped at a finer scale  

Researchers mapped the changes in snow mass from 1982 to 2016 onto a grid of squares 2.5-miles on a side over the entire contiguous U.S. Grid size for previous studies was about 40 miles on a side. Since 1982, some parts of the West have a 41 percent reduction in the yearly maximum mass of snow.

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2018-12-12 09:33:20



Secrets of iron storage in algae  

New research shows that phytoplankton iron storage strategies may determine which species thrive in changing oceans and impact marine food webs, according to a recent article. The research examined two primary methods of iron storage and found that one makes species more resilient against shortages of the rare and essential element.

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2018-12-12 09:33:17



Buzz! Slap! Ow! Taking the virus out of a mosquito's bite  

They approach with the telltale sign -- a high-pitched whine. It's a warning that you are a mosquito's next meal. But that mosquito might carry a virus, and now the virus is in you. Now, with the help of state-of-the-art technology, researchers can see how a virus moves within a mosquito's body, which could lead to the prevention of mosquitoes transmitting diseases.

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2018-12-12 09:33:14



Developing brains of premature babies benefit from caffeine therapy  

New research shows early caffeine treatment of premature babies born less than 29 weeks' gestation has no long-term negative effects on brain development.

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2018-12-12 09:33:11



How plants can generate electricity to power LED light bulbs  

Researchers have discovered that living plants are literally 'green' power source: they can generate, by a single leaf, more than 150 Volts, enough to simultaneously power 100 LED light bulbs. Researchers also showed that an 'hybrid tree' made of natural and artificial leaves can act as an innovative 'green' electrical generator converting wind into electricity.

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2018-12-12 09:33:08



Maintaining the unlimited potential of stem cells  

Scientists have discovered a new protein complex that keeps the brakes on stem cells, allowing them to maintain their indefinite potential. The new complex, called GBAF, could provide a future target for regenerative medicine.

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2018-12-12 09:33:05



Attention, please! Anticipation of touch takes focus, executive skills  

A study examines what happens in children's brains when they anticipate a touch to the hand, and relates this brain activity to the executive functions the child demonstrates on other mental tasks.

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2018-12-12 09:33:02



Improved understanding of the pathology of dwarfism may lead to new treatment targets  

Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a severe inherited dwarfing condition In PSACH, a genetic mutation leads to abnormal retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cartilage-producing cells (chondrocytes), which interferes with function and cell viability. Investigators describe how this protein accumulation results in 'ER stress' and initiates a host of pathologic changes. These findings may open up new ways to treat PSACH and other ER-stress-re

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2018-12-12 08:20:30



Researchers developing nonopioid drug for chronic pain  

Researchers are developing a drug -- now in its earliest stages -- that can treat certain types of chronic pain without the addictive consequences of opioids.

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2018-12-12 08:20:24



Faster, cheaper test can help predict risk of metastasis in prostate cancer patients  

A report describes a new assay to assess copy number alterations that is cheaper, faster, reproducible, and requires less tissue than other diagnostic techniques and has the potential to significantly enhance prostate cancer evaluation.

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2018-12-12 07:18:08



Fire's effects on soil moisture, runoff  

The 2011 Las Conchas mega-fire in New Mexico burned more than 150,000 acres and threatened the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Now, using data from the fire, researchers have created an experimental model that will help us better understand the interactions of fire and water in the soil.

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2018-12-12 07:18:03



College textbooks largely overlook the most common animals  

A recent study of textbooks aimed at introductory biology courses finds that they devote less than one percent of their text to discussing insects, which make up more than 60 percent of animal species. The study authors argue that this provides a poor foundation for understanding ecosystems, biodiversity, and other core aspects of biological research.

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2018-12-12 07:17:51



Novel technique may significantly reduce breast biopsies  

A novel technique that uses mammography to determine the biological tissue composition of a tumor could help reduce unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new study.

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2018-12-11 19:21:53



Sun-soaking device turns water into superheated steam  

Engineers have built a device that soaks up enough heat from the sun to boil water and produce 'superheated' steam hotter than 100 degrees Celsius, without any expensive optics.

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2018-12-11 19:21:50



Dracula ants possess fastest known animal appendage: The snap-jaw  

Move over, trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimp: There's a faster appendage in town. According to a new study, the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae, can snap its mandibles at speeds of up to 90 meters per second (more than 200 mph), making it the fastest animal movement on record.

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2018-12-11 19:21:43



New review of scientific studies confirms food cravings can be reduced  

Food craving, the intense desire to eat certain foods, can sabotage efforts to maintain healthy eating habits and body weight, no matter the time of year. However, an examination of 28 current peer-reviewed scientific studies largely substantiates findings that changes in diet, prescription medications, physical activity and bariatric surgery reduce craving.

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2018-12-11 19:00:21



New models sense human trust in smart machines  

New 'classification models' sense how well humans trust intelligent machines they collaborate with, a step toward improving the quality of interactions and teamwork.

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2018-12-11 19:00:18



Workplace exposure to pesticides and metals linked to heightened heart disease risk  

Workplace exposure to metals and pesticides is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in Hispanic and Latino workers, reveals new research.

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2018-12-11 19:00:08



Trying to get people to agree? Skip the French restaurant and go out for Chinese food  

When people in a business negotiation share not just a meal but a plate, they collaborate better and reach deals faster, according to new research.

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2018-12-11 16:32:27



Taming turbulence: Seeking to make complex simulations a breeze  

Previously intractable problems for designing fusion experiments, improving weather models, and understanding astrophysical phenomena such as star formation will be more easily addressed without the need for expensive supercomputers using a new model.

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2018-12-11 16:15:22



Disruption of circadian rhythm as risk factor for diseases  

Scientists report a time-keeping mechanism in liver cells that helps sustain key organ tasks can contribute to diseases when its natural rhythm is disrupted.

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2018-12-11 16:15:19



Are you stressed? Your eyes may provide a window into your mental workload  

With nearly breakneck speed, the demands of work productivity in today's society seem to have increased tenfold. Enter multitasking as a way to cope with the insistence that tasks be completed almost immediately. Previous studies on workload and productivity include physical aspects, such as how much a person walks or carries, but they do not take into account a person's state of mind. Now, researchers have discovered a person's eyes may offer a solution.

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2018-12-11 15:06:39



What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health  

A new study examines one key stress-inducing circumstance -- the effects of social hierarchy -- and how cells respond to the hormones that are released in response to that stress.

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2018-12-11 14:46:48



Hypoxic dead zones found in urban streams, not just at the coast  

A new study finds that hypoxic dead zones occur in nutrient-laden urban streams, not just in coastal waters. The research shows that intense storm flows can erode some stream channels to become a series of pools that trap nutrient-laden runoff. The elevated nutrient levels in the water spur greater consumption of dissolved oxygen by bacteria, causing the pools to become hypoxic until the next storm flushes them out.

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2018-12-11 14:46:44



Guidelines for the therapeutic use of melatonin  

Professors discuss the general criteria to be considered when prescribing the pineal hormone as a health supplement. The guidelines will help health professionals to analyze, understand and interpret the effects of melatonin.

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2018-12-11 13:33:20



Historic earthquakes test Indonesia's seismic hazard assessment  

Using data gleaned from historical reports, researchers have now identified the sources of some of the most destructive Indonesian earthquakes in Java, Bali and Nusa Tenggara, using these data to independently test how well Indonesia's 2010 and 2017 seismic hazard assessments perform in predicting damaging ground motion.

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2018-12-11 13:33:17



Stop sterilizing your dust  

A new study has found that an antimicrobial chemical called triclosan is abundant in dust -- and linked to changes in its genetic makeup. The result is dust with organisms that could cause an antibiotic-resistant infection.

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2018-12-11 13:33:14



Stronger pesticide regulations likely needed to protect all bee species, say studies  

Regulators worldwide currently use honeybees as the sole model species failing to account for potential threats posed by agrochemicals to the full diversity of bee species from bumblebees to solitary bees, which are probably more important for pollination of food crops than managed honeybees. They are potentially more vulnerable to pesticides given they nest in the ground and bumblebee queens have different life cycles that could increase exposure.

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2018-12-11 12:25:01



Employee incentives can lead to unethical behavior in the workplace  

Findings suggest that setting compensation goals can increase dishonesty when managers are also paid a bonus for hitting certain targets.

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2018-12-11 12:24:56



A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island, Texas  

Red wolves, once nearly extinct, again teeter on the abyss. New research finds red wolf ancestry in Texas -- providing opportunities for additional conservation action and difficult policy challenges. Researchers have identified red wolf ''ghost alleles'' in canid population on Galveston Island.

what do you think?

2018-12-11 12:24:49



Gut microbiome may affect some anti-diabetes drugs  

Why do orally-administered drugs for diabetes work for some people but not others? According to researchers, bacteria that make up the gut microbiome may be the culprit.

what do you think?

2018-12-11 12:24:45



Alaska earthquakes offer new insight into improving hazard assessment  

Earthquake hazard assessment often overlooks intra-slab earthquakes. EarthScope Transportable Array data for the 2016 Iniskin and Nov. 30, 2018 Anchorage earthquakes in Alaska offer new insight into potential causes of heavy shaking from these intra-slab events.

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2018-12-11 12:24:42



Shape-shifting cell breakthrough  

A new computational model gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.

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2018-12-11 12:24:39



Internet therapy apps reduce depression symptoms  

In a sweeping new study, psychologists have found that a series of self-guided, internet-based therapy platforms effectively reduce depression.

what do you think?

2018-12-11 12:24:36



New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule  

Scientists who recently identified the molecular start of Alzheimer's disease have used that finding to determine that it should be possible to forecast which type of dementia will develop over time -- a form of personalized medicine for neurodegenerative diseases.

what do you think?

2018-12-11 12:24:33






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