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Science Daily: News Articles in Science, Health, Environment Technology

Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate environment, computers, engineering, health medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations. id=metasummary ScienceDaily -- the Internet's premier science news web site -- brings you the latest discoveries in science, health & medicine, the environment, space, technology, and computers, from the world's leading universities and research institutions. Updated several times a day, Science Daily also offers free search of its archive of more than 80,000 stories, as well as related articles, images, videos, books, and journal references in hundreds of different topics, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, and more.



Ocean circulation likely to blame for severity of 2018 red tide around Florida  

2018 was the worst year for red tide in more than a decade. A new study reveals what made it so severe.

what do you think?

2019-04-18 13:51:30



Why language technology can't handle Game of Thrones (yet)  

Researchers have performed a thorough evaluation of four different name recognition tools on popular 40 novels, including A Game of Thrones. Their analyses highlight types of names and texts that are particularly challenging for these tools to identify as well as solutions for mitigating this.

what do you think?

2019-04-18 13:41:36



Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore  

Paleontologists have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys.

what do you think?

2019-04-18 13:09:55



Can science writing be automated?  

A team of researchers has developed a neural network, a form of artificial intelligence, that can read scientific papers and render a plain-English summary in a sentence or two.

what do you think?

2019-04-18 09:16:21



Novel antibody may suppress HIV for up to four months  

Regular infusions of an antibody that blocks the HIV binding site on human immune cells may have suppressed levels of HIV for up to four months in people undergoing a short-term pause in their antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. Results of the Phase 2, open-label study indicate the antibody, known as UB-421, was safe and did not induce the production of antibody-resistant HIV.

what do you think?

2019-04-18 03:08:06



Amazonian soils mapped using indicator species  

Understanding the ecology and distributions of species in Amazonia is hampered by lack of information about environmental conditions, such as soils. Plant occurrence data are typically more abundant than soil samples in poorly known areas, and researchers have now developed a method that uses both plant and soil data to produce a map of soil properties.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 21:26:14



Major study finds one in five children have mental health problems  

One in five Ontario children and youth suffer from a mental disorder, but less than one-third have had contact with a mental health care provider. A new study included 10,802 children and youth aged four to 17 in 6,537 families. It replicated and expanded on the landmark 1983 Ontario Child Health Study of 3,290 children in 1,869 families.

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2019-04-17 21:18:37



Bacterial therapy in a dish  

Biomedical engineers have developed a system that can study 10s to 100s of programmed bacteria within mini-tissues in a dish, condensing study time from months to days. The speed and high throughput of their technology allows for stable growth of bacteria within tumor spheroids and can also be used for other bacteria species and cell types. The team says this study is the first to rapidly screen and characterize bacteria therapies in vitro.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 20:22:04



The Cerrado once connected the Andes with the Atlantic Rainforest  

A genetic and computational analysis of birds suggests that the Andean and Atlantic tropical forests, which are now almost a thousand kilometers apart, were connected via the Cerrado in the distant past.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 19:45:05



New study targets Achilles' heel of pancreatic cancer, with promising results  

Advanced pancreatic cancer is often symptomless, leading to late diagnosis only after metastases have spread throughout the body. Now, researchers have uncovered the role of a signaling protein, called LIF, that may be the Achilles' heel of pancreatic cancer.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 18:50:39



Switch from hunting to herding recorded in ancient urine  

A new study begins to resolve the scale and pace of change during the first phases of animal domestication beyond the Fertile Crescent. To reconstruct this history, the authors turned to an unusual source: urine salts left behind by humans and animals.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 17:49:49



Decoding the movement patterns of tsunami-like solitary waves  

A study of solitary tsunami-style wave clusters shows how they move in harmony with and through each other.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 17:26:51



Vitamin D study sheds light on immune system effects  

Scientists have uncovered fresh insights into how vitamin D affects the immune system and might influence susceptibility to diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 17:15:52



Giving robots a better feel for object manipulation  

A new learning system improves robots' abilities to mold materials into target shapes and make predictions about interacting with solid objects and liquids. The system, known as a learning-based particle simulator, could give industrial robots a more refined touch -- and it may have fun applications in personal robotics, such as modelling clay shapes or rolling sticky rice for sushi.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 16:44:26



Why lightning often strikes twice  

Scientists have used the LOFAR radio telescope to study the development of lightning flashes in unprecedented detail. Their work reveals that the negative charges inside a thundercloud are not discharged all in a single flash, but are in part stored alongside the leader channel at Interruptions, inside structures which the researchers have called needles. This may cause a repeated discharge to the ground.

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2019-04-17 16:42:21



Scientists advance a way to track changes in a person's cardiovascular system  

Every heart beat sends blood flowing throughout the human body. While an electrocardiogram uses a contact approach to measure the electrical activity of the heart, a ballistocardiogram is a non-contact way of measuring the mechanical effect of the blood flow through the cardiovascular system.

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2019-04-17 16:01:48



Critical errors in inhaler technique common in children with asthma  

In the first study to evaluate inhaler technique in children hospitalized for asthma -- the group at highest risk for complications and death from asthma -- researchers found that nearly half of participants demonstrated improper inhaler use, which means they routinely were not taking in the full dose of medication. Adolescents most commonly displayed critical errors in inhaler technique.

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2019-04-17 14:41:33



Scientists restore some functions in a pig's brain hours after death  

Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 14:39:18



Why researchers are mapping the world's manure  

Farmers rely on phosphorus fertilizers to enrich the soil and ensure bountiful harvests, but the world's recoverable reserves of phosphate rocks, from which such fertilizers are produced, are finite and unevenly distributed.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 14:38:20



Espresso yourself: Coffee thoughts leave a latte on the mind  

For millions of Australians, each day begins with a hot cup of coffee in order to activate our brains for the working day. The morning coffee run also acts a social lubricant, a creature comfort and, for some, a non-negotiable ritual.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 14:36:05



Researchers pinpoint tumor-related protein, slow progression of cancers  

A new study has identified a potential strategy for treating multiple forms of cancerous tumors: targeting a protein that maliciously rewires immune cells and impedes cancer therapies. The researchers showed that inhibiting the protein with an existing compound helped slow or even reject tumors stemming from four cancers.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 14:06:33



Taking care of people with TBI: New tool could speed caregiver research  

A traumatic brain injury happens in an instant: a battlefield blast, a car crash, a bad fall. But the effects can last a lifetime -- and can leave the survivor dependent on daily care from their loved ones for decades. Now, a new tool seeks to give a voice to those caregivers, who spend countless hours tending to the daily needs of family members whose moods, thinking and abilities seemed to change overnight.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 13:56:49



New deep-learning approach predicts protein structure from amino acid sequence  

A scientist has used a form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning to predict the 3D structure of effectively any protein based on its amino acid sequence. This new approach for computationally determining protein structure achieves accuracy comparable to current state-of-the-art methods but at speeds upward of a million times faster.

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2019-04-17 13:46:05



World-record quantum computing  

A world-record result in reducing errors in semiconductor electron 'spin qubits', a type of building block for quantum computers, has been achieved.

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2019-04-17 13:33:52



Technology automatically senses how Parkinson's patients respond to medication  

Adjusting the frequency and dosage of Parkinson's patients' medication is complex. In their 'ON' state they respond positively to medication and in their 'OFF' state symptoms return. Addressing these fluctuations requires a clinical exam, history-taking or a patient's self-report, which are not always practical or reliable. A new technology that combines an algorithm with a senor-based system using wearable motion sensors, automatically, continuously and reliably detects a patient's medication O

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2019-04-17 13:10:54



Five planets revealed after 20 years of observation  

To confirm the presence of a planet, it is necessary to wait until it has made one or more revolutions around its star. This can take from a few days for the closest to the star to decades for the furthest away. Only a telescope dedicated to the search for exoplanets can carry out such measurements over such long periods of time, which is the case of the EULER telescope of UNIGE.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 13:06:33



Oral immunotherapy safe for preschool-aged children with peanut allergies, study suggests  

New data suggests that oral immunotherapy offered as routine treatment in a hospital or clinic is safe for preschool-aged children with peanut allergies.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 12:57:13



Coelacanth reveals new insights into skull evolution  

An international team of researchers presents the first observations of the development of the skull and brain in the living coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae. Their study provides new insights into the biology of this iconic animal and the evolution of the vertebrate skull.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 12:49:28



Puncture performance of viper fangs measured  

A team that studies how biological structures such as cactus spines and mantis shrimp appendages puncture living tissue has turned its attention to viper fangs. Specifically, the scientists wanted to know, what physical characteristics contribute to fangs' sharpness and ability to puncture?

what do you think?

2019-04-17 12:33:11



Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our Sun  

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our Sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 12:10:12



Factors behind embryonic stem cell state  

An international collaboration has found for the first time that two new epigenetic regulators, TAF5L and TAF6L, maintain self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. The scientists also found that these proteins activate c-Myc (a well-known cancer gene), and its regulatory network. This is the first time scientists have been able to show what these regulators do and how they control gene expression.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 12:04:42



Solution to riddle of ocean carbon storage  

Research by a team of the world's leading oceanographers has proposed a new explanation for how the ocean absorbs and stores carbon, solving a riddle that has long puzzled scientists. It's well established that carbon in the atmosphere is absorbed by phytoplankton and transported to the ocean floor as the microscopic organisms die and sink by gravity through the water.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 11:51:45



Powerful particles and tugging tides may affect extraterrestrial life  

Two new studies, one on high-energy particles and the other on tidal forces, may bring into question the habitability of TRAPPIST-1 exoplanets.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 11:47:27



Microbiome science may help doctors deliver more effective, personalized treatment to children with irritable bowel syndrome  

To improve the treatment of children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), investigators have developed a sophisticated way to analyze the microbial and metabolic contents of the gut. A report describes how a new battery of tests enables researchers to distinguish patients with IBS from healthy children and identifies correlations between certain microbes and metabolites with abdominal pain. With this information, doctors envision tailoring nutritional and targeted therapies that address a child'

what do you think?

2019-04-17 11:42:05



A comprehensive look at cow's milk  

Milk is a staple of the human diet, full of key nutrients such as protein, carbohydrates, fats, and vitamins. Cow's milk in particular is one of the most-used dairy products globally, with over 800 million tons produced annually. Today, scientists report a comprehensive, centralized database of all known bovine milk compounds.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 11:13:45



Boosting muscle stem cells to treat muscular dystrophy and aging muscles  

Scientists have uncovered a molecular signaling pathway involving Stat3 and Fam3a proteins that regulates how muscle stem cells decide whether to self-renew or differentiate -- an insight that could lead to muscle-boosting therapeutics for muscular dystrophies or age-related muscle decline.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 11:06:59



Fragments of cellular machinery reveal unexpected variability among cancers  

New research shows the mitochondrial genome may play a significant role in these fragment interactions with cancer.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 10:59:37



New study shows people used natural dyes to color their clothing thousands of years ago  

Even thousands of years ago people wore clothing with colorful patterns made from plant and animal-based dyes. Chemists have created new analytical methods to examine textiles from China and Peru that are several thousand years old. They describe their new method that is able to reconstruct the spatial distribution of dyes, and hence the patterns, in textile samples.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 10:53:22



Mercury has a solid inner core: New evidence  

Scientists have long known that Earth and Mercury have metallic cores. Like Earth, Mercury's outer core is composed of liquid metal, but there have only been hints that Mercury's innermost core is solid. Now, in a new study, scientists report evidence that Mercury's inner core is indeed solid and that it is very nearly the same size as Earth's solid inner core.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 10:18:09



New way to improve cybersecurity  

Researchers may have identified a new way to improve network security.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 09:25:06



The Leukemia Atlas: Researchers unveil proteins that signal disease  

Only about one in four people diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) survive five years after the initial diagnosis. To improve that survival rate, researchers have created an online atlas to identify and classify protein signatures present at AML diagnosis.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 09:23:59



Cannabidiol could help deliver medications to the brain  

Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive compound in cannabis, is being touted as beneficial for many health conditions, ranging from anxiety to epilepsy. Although much more research is needed to verify these claims, scientists have now shown that CBD could have a different use as a 'Trojan horse': helping slip medications across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and into mouse brains.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 08:50:25



Genetics behind the evolution of flightless birds  

Based on the analysis of the genomes of more than a dozen flightless birds, including an extinct moa, researchers found that while different species show wide variety in the protein-coding portions of their genome, they appear to turn to the same regulatory pathways when evolving flight loss.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 08:39:12



Biosensor 'bandage' collects and analyzes sweat  

Like other biofluids, sweat contains a wealth of information about what's going on inside the body. However, collecting the fluid for analysis, usually by dripping or absorbing it from the skin's surface, can be time-consuming and messy. Now, researchers have developed a bandage-like biosensor that both collects and -- in conjunction with a smart phone -- analyzes sweat. The device could someday help diagnose diseases.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 08:36:18



Small fossils with big applications: BP Gulf of Mexico time scale  

Geologic time scales are critical to understanding the timing, duration, and connection of geologic events. They are not static, and can be improved with research, integration, and refinements realized from biostratigraphic repetitive analysis. Over the past century they have proven important tools in petroleum exploration and studies of climatic and geologic events. Still, many geologists may not know the importance of microfossils to the construction of time scales and biostratigraphy.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 07:46:23



How to defend the Earth from asteroids  

The Chelyabinsk meteor caused extensive ground damage and numerous injuries when it exploded on impact with Earth's atmosphere in 2013; to prevent another such impact, scientists plan to use a simple yet ingenious way to spot tiny near-Earth objects.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 07:06:55



Plants and microbes shape global biomes through local underground alliances  

Researchers report that the distribution of forest types worldwide is based on the relationships plant species forged with soil microbes to enhance their uptake of nutrients. These symbioses could help scientists understand how ecosystems may shift as climate change alters the interplay between plants, microbes and soil.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 06:57:04



New PFASs discovered in Cape Fear River, North Carolina, though levels are declining  

In 2015, a fluorosurfactant known by the trade name 'GenX' made headlines when researchers discovered it and related compounds in the Cape Fear River of North Carolina, a source of drinking water for many residents of the area. Now, researchers report that they have detected the same per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the river, as well as some new ones, but their overall levels are decreasing.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 06:13:53



Neotropical cloud forests to lose what most defines them: Clouds  

In as few as 25 years, climate change could shrink and dry 60-80% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests, finds a study published today. If greenhouse gas emissions continue increasing as they have been, 90% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests would be affected as early as 2060. The current cloud and frost environment of the highly diverse alpine ecosystems above these equatorial cloud forests, known as paramo, will nearly disappear.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 05:59:21



Gene therapy restores immunity in infants with rare immunodeficiency disease  

A small clinical trial has shown that gene therapy can safely correct the immune systems of infants newly diagnosed with a rare, life-threatening inherited disorder in which infection-fighting immune cells don't develop or function normally. Eight infants with the disorder, called X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID), received experimental gene therapy. They experienced substantial improvements in immune system function and normal growth up to two years after treatment.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 04:45:14



Need more energy storage? Just hit 'print'  

Researchers have developed a conductive ink made from a special type of material they discovered, called MXene, that was used by the researchers to print components for electronic devices. The ink is additive-free, which means it can print the finished devices in one step without any special finishing treatments.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 04:44:48



Solar panel demand causing spike in worldwide silver prices  

Rising demand for solar panels is having a major effect on the worldwide price of silver, which could lead to solar panel production costs becoming far higher in the future, new research has demonstrated.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 04:34:56



Balancing the ocean carbon budget  

How exactly does the ocean -- the Earth's largest carbon sink -- capture and store carbon? The answer to this question will become increasingly important as the planet warms and as we try to get ahead of a runaway climate scenario.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 04:03:40



How Enterococcus faecalis bacteria causes antibiotic resistant infection  

A new study describes how bacteria adapted to the modern hospital environment and repeatedly cause antibiotic-resistant bloodstream infections. This study examined one of the first sustained hospital outbreaks of a multidrug-resistant bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis, which occurred from the early through the mid-1980s, causing over 60 outbreak strains.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 04:02:15



NASA study verifies global warming trends  

A new study has verified the accuracy of recent global warming figures. The team used measurements of the 'skin' temperature of the Earth taken by a satellite-based infrared measurement system called AIRS (Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder) from 2003 to 2017. They compared these with station-based analyses of surface air temperature anomalies.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 03:55:55



Lessons learnt from the drift analysis of MH370 plane crash debris  

The Boeing 777 of Malaysia Airlines (MH370) has been missing for over five years. The extensive, costly, but unsuccessful search operations have stopped. Scientists have helped by providing insights on the most probable crash site based on debris from the aircraft. In a new study, scientists synthesize what they have learnt and propose strategies for optimizing future interdisciplinary work of this kind.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 03:51:35



School bullying increases chances of mental health issues and unemployment in later life  

Victims of bullying in secondary school have dramatically increased chances of mental health problems and unemployment in later life.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 03:44:20



New software tool could provide answers to some of life's most intriguing questions  

A researcher has spearheaded the development of a software tool that can provide conclusive answers to some of the world's most fascinating questions.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 03:35:17



A light-activated remote control for cells  

What if doctors had a remote control that they could use to steer a patient's own cells to a wound to speed up the healing process? Although such a device is still far from reality, researchers have taken an important first step: They used near-infrared light and an injected DNA nanodevice to guide stem cells to an injury, which helped muscle tissue regrow in mice.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 03:31:58



Green plastic production made easy  

A one-step method enables scalable and more environmentally friendly production of plant-derived plastic monomers, paving the way towards the mass production of a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based materials.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 03:22:13



Heart patch could limit muscle damage in heart attack aftermath  

Guided by computer simulations, an international team of researchers has developed an adhesive patch that can provide support for damaged heart tissue, potentially reducing the stretching of heart muscle that's common after a heart attack.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 03:18:10



Three studies show how tumors hijack the immune system to resist radiation therapy  

Treg cells turn off the immune system. Three recent studies show that targeting tregs may increase the effectiveness of anti-cancer immunotherapies.

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2019-04-17 03:04:48



Gender identity leaves imprint on human brains  

Society's expectations about gender roles alter the human brain at the cellular level, according to a new article.

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2019-04-17 02:39:50



Parboiling method reduces inorganic arsenic in rice  

Contamination of rice with arsenic is a major problem in some regions of the world with high rice consumption. Now, researchers have found a way to reduce inorganic arsenic in rice by modifying processing methods at traditional, small-scale parboiling plants in Bangladesh. The new method has the added benefit of increasing the calcium content of rice, the researchers say.

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2019-04-17 02:14:50



Healthy hearts need two proteins working together  

Two proteins that bind to stress hormones work together to maintain a healthy heart in mice, according to scientists. These proteins, stress hormone receptors known as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), act in concert to help support heart health. When the signaling between the two receptors is out of balance, the mice have heart disease.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 01:53:23



Is one toe really better than three? How horse' legs evolved for travel rather than speed  

Palaeobiologists have uncovered new evidence that suggests that horses' legs have adapted over time to be optimized for endurance travel, rather than speed.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 01:52:20



Features that make lizards appealing to potential mates are resilient to stress  

Physical traits and behaviors that make a lizard sexy -- features used to attract potential mates and fend off competitors -- may be important enough that they do not change in the face of stress, according to researchers.

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2019-04-17 01:36:54



Neuron and synapse-mimetic spintronics devices developed  

A research group has developed spintronics devices which are promising for future energy-efficient and adoptive computing systems, as they behave like neurons and synapses in the human brain.

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2019-04-17 01:35:44



Making a fast ion transporter  

An international team of researchers reveals an ion transport mechanism of sodium/proton antiporter by simulating its motion. Based on the simulations, they now design a faster transporter by making mutation on ''gate'' of the transporter.

what do you think?

2019-04-17 01:26:10



Bacteria harness viruses to distinguish friend from foe  

Bacterial cells that normally colonize our guts can distinguish themselves from other bacterial species using what's traditionally considered their enemy -- a virus. Researchers report that some bacteria use viruses that have infected them (i.e., phages) for self-recognition and thereby show greater fitness, repelling competitors that lack this adaptation.

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2019-04-16 21:23:56



CubeSats prove their worth for scientific missions  

Only a few years ago, the astronomy and heliophysics communities were skeptical about whether CubeSats could reliably obtain scientific data. But these breadloaf-size satellites have proven their ability to return useful data.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 21:15:14



Mindful body awareness training during treatment for drug addiction helps prevent relapse  

A novel type of body awareness training helps women recover from drug addiction, according to new research. People in the study made marked improvement, and many improvements lasted for a year.

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2019-04-16 20:30:46



Astronomers discover third planet in the Kepler-47 circumbinary system  

Astronomers have discovered a third planet in the Kepler-47 system, securing the system's title as the most interesting of the binary-star worlds. Using data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, a team of researchers detected the new Neptune-to-Saturn-size planet orbiting between two previously known planets.

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2019-04-16 20:21:55



Discovery of oral cancer biomarkers could save thousands of lives  

Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that. Researchers have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in patients.

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2019-04-16 20:13:15



NASA's Cassini reveals surprises with Titan's lakes  

On its final flyby of Saturn's largest moon in 2017, NASA's Cassini spacecraft gathered radar data revealing that the small liquid lakes in Titan's northern hemisphere are surprisingly deep, perched atop hills and filled with methane.

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2019-04-16 19:59:20



Scientists crack the code to regenerate plant tissues  

A group of scientists have discovered a new way to regenerate flowering plant tissues, opening possibilities of mitigating global food shortage problem.

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2019-04-16 19:12:21



New form of laser for sound  

The optical laser has grown to a $10 billion global technology market since it was invented in 1960, and has led to Nobel prizes for Art Ashkin for developing optical tweezing and Gerard Mourou and Donna Strickland for work with pulsed lasers. Now scientists have created a different kind of laser -- a laser for sound, using the optical tweezer technique invented by Ashkin.

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2019-04-16 18:47:27



Climate change to blame for Hurricane Maria's extreme rainfall  

Hurricane Maria dropped more rain on Puerto Rico than any storm to hit the island since 1956, a feat due mostly to the effects of human-caused climate warming, new research finds.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 18:33:14



Doubles badminton players may be at highest risk of serious eye injury during play  

Doubles badminton players may be at greatest risk of potentially serious eye injury during matches compared with singles players, suggests a small study.

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2019-04-16 17:30:06



How inland waters 'breathe' carbon -- and what it means for global systems  

A new study reveals important insights into the factors that influence the release of greenhouse gases from rivers and streams, including a key relationship between storm events, ecology, and topography in moderating this release.

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2019-04-16 16:12:48



In mice, feeding time influences the liver's biological clock  

The timing of food intake is a major factor driving the rhythmic expression of most genes in the mouse liver, researchers report. The findings demonstrate that body-wide signals driven by rhythmic food intake significantly contribute to driving rhythms in liver metabolic functions and gene expression independently of the liver and clock.

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2019-04-16 15:40:12



Additional routine ultrasounds benefit mothers and babies, and could be cost saving, study finds  

Offering universal late pregnancy ultrasounds at 36 weeks' gestation eliminates undiagnosed breech presentation of babies, lowers the rate of emergency caesarean sections, and improves the health of mothers and babies.

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2019-04-16 15:27:10



The fluid that feeds tumor cells  

Biologists have found that the nutrient composition of the interstitial fluid that normally surrounds pancreatic tumors is different from that of the culture medium normally used to grow cancer cells.

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2019-04-16 14:38:14



Scientists 'reverse engineer' brain cancer cells to find new targets for treatment  

Glioblastoma is one of the most devastating forms of cancer, with few existing treatment options. It is also a leading cause of cancer-related death in children and young adults. Scientists have 'reverse engineered' brain cancer stem cells gene by gene, uncovering multiple potential targets for this hard-to-treat cancer.

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2019-04-16 14:22:57



Why comic-style information is better at preparing patients for cardiac catheterization  

Before undergoing surgery, patients must be fully informed about what the procedure entails. The complex nature of the information involved means that patients often feel overwhelmed rather than well informed. Researchers have been able to show that patients scheduled to undergo cardiac catheterization may find comic-style information helpful. The researchers' comic-style booklet was shown to help patient comprehension and reduce anxiety.

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2019-04-16 14:21:51



Linkage is a drag: First wheat gene to rapidly convert defective traits for new  

In the quest to separate the good traits from the bad, bioinformatics (computational biology) research, using a data driven strategy in wheat, find the first ever gene associated with gene conversion in plants -- marking an important step in global initiative Designing Future Wheat.

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2019-04-16 13:47:05



When it comes to learning, what's better: The carrot or the stick?  

Does the potential to win or lose money influence the confidence one has in one's own decisions? Researchers investigated confidence bias in a learning context through a system of monetary punishment and reward. They demonstrated that we become more confident in our choices when learning to seek rewards. However, this confidence evolves into over-confidence. Moreover, the monetary gains makes us less flexible, while the fear of losing money preserves our ability to adapt.

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2019-04-16 13:02:23



Sleep Apnea: Oral appliance could help you (and your partner) sleep better  

Researchers measured a novel treatment for sleep apnea and found positive results. By measuring patients lying down flat, the researchers stimulated sleep conditions and measured the patient's airways using 3D imaging. The study confirmed that the treatment is effective at opening the airways and warrants further collaboration between dentists and doctors in treatment of sleep apnea.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 12:34:10



Certain microbes may reduce allergy-like reactions in many people  

A small percentage of humans can suffer allergy-like reactions to certain varieties of ripened cheese due to histamine, a byproduct of the prolonged fermentation process. A researcher is studying bacterial strains that could reduce histamine, allowing susceptible diners to enjoy the cheese without unpleasant side effects.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 12:23:22



Climate change threatens endangered sparrows  

A new study finds that some sparrow species will likely go extinct within the century due to climate change.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 12:12:17



Oxytocin could help treat alcohol use disorder  

The neuropeptide oxytocin blocks enhanced drinking in alcohol-dependent rats, according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 11:58:22



New arsenic-based broad-spectrum antibiotic  

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health threats of our time. There is a pressing need for new and novel antibiotics to combat the rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Researchers have now discovered a new broad-spectrum antibiotic that contains arsenic. Arsinothricin is a natural product made by soil bacteria.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 11:44:15



Common sleep myths compromise good sleep and health  

People often say they can get by on five or fewer hours of sleep, that snoring is harmless, and that having a drink helps you to fall asleep. These are, in fact, among the most widely held myths about sleeping that not only shape poor habits, but may also pose a significant public health threat.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 11:31:06



Mid-life resting heart rate of 75 plus beats/minute linked to doubling in early death risk  

A resting heart rate of 75 beats per minute in mid-life is linked to a doubling in the risk of an early death from all causes -- at least among men.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 10:47:46



New algorithm allows for faster, animal-free chemical toxicity testing  

The use of animals to test the toxicity of chemicals may one day become outdated thanks to a low-cost, high-speed algorithm.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 10:33:22



Smart antioxidant-containing polymer responds to body chemistry, environment  

Oxidants found within living organisms are byproducts of metabolism and are essential to wound-healing and immunity. However, when their concentrations become too high, inflammation and tissue damage can occur. Engineers have now developed and tested a new drug-delivery system that senses high oxidant levels and responds by administering just the right amount of antioxidant to restore this delicate balance.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 09:36:50



Solar evaporator offers a fresh route to fresh water  

Researchers have demonstrated a successful prototype of one critical component for affordable small-scale desalination: an inexpensive solar evaporator, made of wood.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 09:32:38



A novel data-compression technique for faster computer programs  

A novel technique rethinks hardware data compression to free up more memory used by computers and mobile devices, allowing them to run faster and perform more tasks simultaneously.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 09:24:48



Magic mouthwash effective treatment for mouth sore pain caused by radiation therapy  

'Magic mouthwash,' an oral rinse containing diphenhydramine, lidocaine and antacids, significantly reduced pain from oral mucositis, mouth sores, in patients receiving radiation therapy for cancers of the head and neck when compared to plaecbo.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 09:19:23



New discovery makes fast-charging, better performing lithium-ion batteries possible  

Creating a lithium-ion battery that can charge in a matter of minutes but still operate at a high capacity is possible. This development has the potential to improve battery performance for consumer electronics, solar grid storage, and electric vehicles.

what do you think?

2019-04-16 09:16:18






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