The top stories, the best sites.
            
Poll: What's the future for Trump and the U.S.?
articles

content feeds for your site



sciencedaily.com      in your list

Science Daily: News Articles in Science, Health, Environment Technology

Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate environment, computers, engineering, health medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations. id=metasummary ScienceDaily -- the Internet's premier science news web site -- brings you the latest discoveries in science, health & medicine, the environment, space, technology, and computers, from the world's leading universities and research institutions. Updated several times a day, Science Daily also offers free search of its archive of more than 80,000 stories, as well as related articles, images, videos, books, and journal references in hundreds of different topics, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, and more.



DNA fracturing rewires gene control in cancer  

A multi-institutional team has brought attention to genomic structural variation as a previously unappreciated mechanism involved in altering DNA methylation, a form of gene control, in human cancers.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:54:05



Strong storms generating earthquake-like seismic activity  

Researcher have uncovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can spark seismic events in the nearby ocean as strong as a 3.5 magnitude earthquake.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:54:01



Soil on moon and Mars likely to support crops  

Researchers have produced crops in Mars and moon soil simulant developed by NASA. The research supports the idea that it would not only be possible to grow food on Mars and the moon to feed future settlers, but also to obtain viable seed from crops grown there.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:53:59



Chemists create self-assembling material with suite of new properties  

Chemists have created a new material that self-assembles into 2D networks in a predictable and reproducible manner. They have successfully synthesized a complex material by design -- paving the way for its suite of new properties to be applied in many fields.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:53:58



The makeup of mariculture: Global trends in seafood farming  

The process of farming seafood in the ocean, known as mariculture, is a growing trend yet little is known about the trajectories of its development. That's why a team of researchers set out to shed some light on the industry.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:33:20



Overlap allows nanoparticles to enhance light-based detection  

Scientists use the plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticles to amplify light from molecules triggered by electrochemiluminescence. The work could help researchers analyze the active surfaces of catalysts and other materials at the nanoscale.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:33:18



Widely available drug reduces head injury deaths  

A low cost and widely available drug could reduce deaths in traumatic brain injury patients by as much as 20%, depending on the severity of injury, according to a major study. The researchers say that tranexamic acid (TXA), a drug that prevents bleeding into the brain by inhibiting blood clot breakdown, has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:33:16



Politics: Being attractive helps, but it isn't everything  

The question may be as old as democracy itself: are physically attractive people elected more often than less attractive opponents? Scientists have found out that looking good can at least partly explain success in elections. "However, a candidate's party affiliation still has the biggest impact on a voter's decision," adds one of the researchers.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:33:13



Empty spaces, how do they make a protein unstable?  

Partial unfolding of proteins can be a major challenge in the industry, as it may affect the stability of products. So how does an empty space or cavity in its hydrophobic core destabilize a protein? And would such a cavity, in fact, be empty? These are some of the questions that researchers answer in a new study.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:33:11



'Back in time': Researchers unravel early makings of an exhausted T cell  

Researchers explore the path to T-cell exhaustion and what triggers it is.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:33:09



Genetics to feed the world  

A study has demonstrated the effectiveness of the technology known as genomic selection in a wheat improvement program.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:07:01



Analysis of Galileo's Jupiter entry probe reveals gaps in heat shield modeling  

The entry probe of the Galileo mission to Jupiter entered the planet's atmosphere in 1995 in fiery fashion, generating enough heat to cause plasma reactions on its surface. The data relayed about the burning of its heat shield differed from the effects predicted in fluid dynamics models, and new work examines what might have caused such a discrepancy. Researchers now report their findings from new fluid radiative dynamics models.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:06:59



Tissue damage caused by a heart attack to be reduced by 30%?  

A heart attack is caused by a clot that blocks the artery blood flow. Under these conditions, the affected tissues undergo a rapid necrosis. But why? Scientists discovered that the synthesis of a lipid provokes the necrosis. This lipid accumulates in the absence of oxygen and blocks cellular functions. By inhibiting its synthesis in a mouse suffering a heart attack, the biologists were able to reduce the tissue damage by 30%.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:06:57



Happy, angry or neutral expressions? Eyes react just as fast  

Scientists have investigated how our eyes and brain react when we see emotionally charged or neutral faces. She combined eye-tracking and electroencephalography (EEG). The result: reflex-like eye movements are independent of the expression a face shows; our attention is drawn to them just as fast.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:06:55



Monkeys can also thank their body for vocal development, not only their brain  

Development of vocal behavior during maturation is typically attributed to the brain. But the body itself is also capable of guiding this development. New experiments with marmoset monkeys show that we should not ignore the body's own amazing capabilities.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:06:52



Researchers build a soft robot with neurologic capabilities  

In work that combines a deep understanding of the biology of soft-bodied animals such as earthworms with advances in materials and electronic technologies, researchers have developed a robotic device containing a stretchable transistor that allows neurological function.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:06:50



Changes associated with Alzheimer's disease detectable in blood samples  

Researchers have discovered new changes in blood samples associated with Alzheimer's disease. A new international study was conducted on disease-discordant Finnish twin pairs: one sibling suffering from Alzheimer's disease and the other being cognitively healthy. The researchers utilised the latest genome-wide methods to examine the twins' blood samples for any disease-related differences in epigenetic marks which are sensitive to changes in environmental factors. These differences between the s

what do you think?

2019-10-15 11:06:47



Diversity may be key to reducing errors in quantum computing  

In quantum computing, as in team building, a little diversity can help get the job done better, computer scientists have discovered.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 10:34:11



Repeated febrile convulsions linked to epilepsy and psychiatric disorders  

The risk of febrile convulsions increases with the child's fever, and children who suffer from repeated febrile convulsions during their first year of life have an increased risk of developing epilepsy and psychiatric disorders later in life. This is shown by a comprehensive register-based study. In the study, almost 76,000 Danish children who have been suffering from febrile convulsions have been followed for more than 30 years.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 10:34:08



Survival strategy found in living corals which was only seen in fossil records  

Some corals can recover after massive mortality episodes caused by the water temperature rise. This survival mechanism in the marine environment -- known as rejuvenation -- had only been described in some fossil corals so far. A new study reveals the first scientific evidence of the rejuvenation phenomenon in vivo in Cladocora caespitosa coral colonies, in the marine reserve in Columbrets, in the coast of Castellón.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 10:34:06



Super light dampers for low tones  

A team of acoustic researchers has built macroscopic crystal structures that use internal rotation to attenuate the propagation of waves. The method makes it possible to build very light and stiff materials that can also 'swallow' low frequencies very well, as they report.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 10:34:04



Mindfulness may reduce opioid cravings, study finds  

People suffering from opioid addiction and chronic pain may have fewer cravings and less pain if they use both mindfulness techniques and medication for opioid dependence, according to researchers.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 10:33:58



Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare the host for any eventuality  

Deep-sea mussels, which rely on symbiotic bacteria for food, harbor a surprisingly high diversity of these bacterial 'cooks': Up to 16 different bacterial strains live in the mussel's gills, each with its own abilities and strengths. Thanks to this diversity, the mussel is prepared for all eventualities, researchers report.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 10:33:56



Heavier birth weight linked to childhood allergies  

New research shows that the more a baby weighs at birth relative to its gestational age the higher the risk they will suffer from childhood food allergy or eczema, although not hay fever.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 10:33:54



Controlling the charge state of organic molecule quantum dots in a 2D nanoarray  

Researchers have fabricated a self-assembled, carbon-based nanofilm where the charge state (ie, electronically neutral or positive) can be controlled at the level of individual molecules. Molecular self-assembly on a metal results in a high-density, 2D, organic quantum-dot array with electric-field-controllable charge state, with the organic molecules used as 'nano-sized building blocks' in fabrication of functional nanomaterials. Achieved densities are an order of magnitude larger than conventi

what do you think?

2019-10-15 10:33:53



Potential therapy to treat detrimental effects of marijuana  

A new study using a preclinical animal model suggests that prenatal exposure to THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis, makes the brain's dopamine neurons (an integral component of the reward system) hyperactive and increases sensitivity to the behavioral effects of THC during pre-adolescence.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 09:22:47



New method for quicker and simpler production of lipidated proteins  

The new method is leading to a better understanding of natural protein modifications and improved protein therapeutics.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 09:22:45



Telescope technology used to take first accurate images of glaucoma-related eye structure  

Researchers have used adaptive optics technology to create the first undistorted microscopic images of the eye's trabecular meshwork, which could help improve treatment for glaucoma.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 09:22:43



Quantum paradox experiment may lead to more accurate clocks and sensors  

More accurate clocks and sensors may result from a recently proposed experiment, linking an Einstein-devised paradox to quantum mechanics. A physicist said the international collaboration aimed to test Einstein's twin paradox using quantum particles in a 'superposition' state.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 09:22:42



Achieving a safe and just future for the ocean economy  

much attention has been given to the growth of the 'Blue Economy' -- a term which refers to the sustainable use of ocean and marine resources for economic growth, jobs, and improved livelihoods. Ocean resources are viewed as lucrative areas for increased investment, including in fisheries, aquaculture, bio-prospecting, renewable energy, oil and gas, and other businesses. Ensuring that socially equitable and sustainable development occurs should be the mandate of governments and industry, maintai

what do you think?

2019-10-15 09:22:38



New approach to slowing nearsightedness in children shows promise  

Combining 2 different treatment methods to slow the progression of myopia may deliver better results than either can achieve on their own.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 09:22:36



Fire blankets can protect buildings from wildfires  

Wrapping a building in a fire-protective blanket is a viable way of protecting it against wildfires, finds the first study to scientifically assess this method of defense. Rigorous testing reveals that existing blanket technology can protect structures from a short wildfire attack, but for successful deployment against severe fires and in areas of high housing density, technological advancement of blanket materials and deployment methods, as well as multi-structure protection strategies, are nee

what do you think?

2019-10-15 07:53:19



Rare 'itinerant breeding' behavior revealed in California bird  

Only two bird species have ever been shown to undertake what scientists call 'itinerant breeding': nesting in one area, migrating to another region, and nesting again there within the same year, to take advantage of shifting food resources. However, new research provides strong evidence of this rare behavior in a third bird -- the Phainopepla, a unique bird found in the southwestern US and the northernmost member of an otherwise tropical family.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 07:53:14



Taming the wild cheese fungus  

The flavors of fermented foods are heavily shaped by the fungi that grow on them, but the evolutionary origins of those fungi aren't well understood. Experimental findings offer microbiologists a new view on how those molds evolve from wild strains into the domesticated ones used in food production.

what do you think?

2019-10-15 07:52:41



Study finds topsoil is key harbinger of lead exposure risks for children  

Tracking lead levels in soil over time is critical for cities to determine lead contamination risks for their youngest and most vulnerable residents, according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 18:16:54



Investing in love and affection pays off for species that mate for life  

A new study by biologists explains how sexual cooperation and bonding evolves in bird species that form pair bonds.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 18:16:52



Non-pharmacologic treatments may be more effective for psychiatric symptoms of dementia  

A systematic review and meta-analysis suggests outdoor activities were more clinically effective than anti-psychotic medication for treating physical aggression in patients with dementia. For patients with physical agitation, massage and touch therapy were more efficacious than usual care or caregiver support.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 18:16:50



Sensory and motor brain plasticity is not limited by location  

The new function of unused cortical regions is not necessarily determined by the function of nearby cortical regions, according to new research in adults born without one hand.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 13:33:21



Unlocking the biochemical treasure chest within microbes  

An international team of scientists has developed a genetic engineering tool that makes producing and analyzing microbial secondary metabolites -- the basis for many important agricultural, industrial, and medical products -- easier than ever before, and could even lead to breakthroughs in biomanufacturing.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 12:26:20



Scientists help immune system find hidden cancer cells  

Cancer cells are masters at avoiding detection, but a new system can make them stand out from the crowd and help the immune system spot and eliminate tumors that other forms of immunotherapies might miss.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:47



Lakes worldwide are experiencing more severe algal blooms  

The intensity of summer algal blooms has increased over the past three decades, according to a first-ever global survey of dozens of large, freshwater lakes. Researchers used 30 years of data from the Landsat 5 near-Earth satellite and created a partnership with Google Earth Engine to reveal long-term trends in summer algal blooms in 71 large lakes in 33 countries on six continents.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:46



Women have substantially less influence on Twitter than men in academic medicine  

Women who are health policy or health services researchers face a significant disparity in social media influence compared to their male peers, according to a new study. Although the average number of tweets among all researchers tend to be consistent, women trail behind men in follower counts, regardless of how active they are on Twitter.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:42



Microbleeds may worsen outcome after head injury  

Using advanced imaging, researchers have uncovered new information regarding traumatic microbleeds, which appear as small, dark lesions on MRI scans after head injury but are typically too small to be detected on CT scans. The findings published in Brain suggest that traumatic microbleeds are a form of injury to brain blood vessels and may predict worse outcomes. The study was conducted in part by scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the Nati

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:38



How mucus tames microbes  

A study from MIT reveals glycans, branched sugar molecules found in mucus, can prevent bacteria from communicating with each other and forming infectious biofilms, effectively rendering the microbes harmless.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:37



How to control friction in topological insulators  

Topological insulators are innovative materials that conduct electricity on the surface, but act as insulators on the inside. Physicists have begun investigating how they react to friction. Their experiment shows that the heat generated through friction is significantly lower than in conventional materials. This is due to a new quantum mechanism, the researchers report.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:35



Researchers explore spinal discs' early response to injury and ways to improve it  

Researchers showed in animal models that the default injury response of spinal discs can be temporarily stopped to allow for better treatment.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:33



The nano-guitar string that plays itself  

Scientists have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force. Just as a guitar string vibrates when plucked, the wire -- 100,000 times thinner than a guitar string -- vibrates when forced into motion by an oscillating voltage. The surprise came when they repeated the experiment without the forcing voltage. Under the right conditions, the wire oscillated of its own accord. The nano-guitar string was playing itself.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:31



Dementia spreads via connected brain networks  

Scientists used maps of brain connections to predict how brain atrophy would spread in individual patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), adding to growing evidence that the loss of brain cells associated with dementia spreads via the synaptic connections between established brain networks.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:30



Shipment tracking for 'fat parcels' in the body  

Without fat, nothing works in the body: These substances serve as energy suppliers and important building blocks -- including for the envelopes of living cells. Numerous diseases are related to disorders in the fat metabolism, such as obesity or cancer. Researchers are now demonstrating how the fat metabolism can be monitored down to the individual liver cell of a mouse with the greatest sensitivity.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:28



Evolutionary history of oaks  

Oaks have a complex evolutionary history that has long eluded scientists. New research, however, provides the most detailed account to date of the evolution of oaks, recovering the 56-million-year history that has made the oaks one of the most diverse, abundant and important woody plant groups to the ecology and economy of the northern hemisphere.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:26



Unique sticky particles formed by harnessing chaos  

New research shows that unique materials with distinct properties akin to those of gecko feet - the ability to stick to just about any surface -- can be created by harnessing liquid-driven chaos to produce soft polymer microparticles with hierarchical branching on the micro- and nanoscale.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:24



Scientists pinpoint cause of harmful dendrites and whiskers in lithium batteries  

Scientists have uncovered a root cause of the growth of needle-like structures -- known as dendrites and whiskers -- that plague lithium batteries, sometimes causing a short circuit, failure, or even a fire. Such defects are a major factor holding back the batteries from even more widespread use and further improvement.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:23



Astronomers use giant galaxy cluster as X-ray magnifying lens  

Astronomers have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:18



Cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device  

Researchers have shown for the first time that a cheap catalyst can split water and generate hydrogen gas for hours on end in the harsh environment of a commercial electrolyzer -- a step toward clean, large-scale hydrogen production for fuel, fertilizer and industry.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:16



Scientists reveal mechanism of electron charge exchange in molecules  

Through a new scanning transmission electron microscopy method, researchers are able to observe electron distribution between atoms and molecules and uncover clues to the origins of ferroelectricity, the capacity of certain crystals to possess spontaneous electric polarization that can be switched by the application of an electric field. The research also revealed the mechanism of charge transfer between two materials.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:14



Reading the past like an open book: Researchers use text to measure 200 years of happiness  

Using innovative new methods researchers have built a new index that uses data from books and newspaper to track levels of national happiness from 1820. Their research could help governments to make better decisions about policy priorities.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 11:17:13



New genetic-based epilepsy risk scores  

An international team of researchers has developed new genetic-based epilepsy risk scores which may lay the foundation for a more personalized method of epilepsy diagnosis and treatment. This analysis is the largest study of epilepsy genetics to date, as well as the largest study of epilepsy using human samples.

what do you think?

2019-10-14 09:06:06



Drug reverses signs of liver disease in people living with HIV  

Researchers report that the injectable hormone tesamorelin reduces liver fat and prevents liver fibrosis (scarring) in people living with HIV.

what do you think?

2019-10-12 14:12:28



New design strategy can help improve layered superconducting materials  

Scientists have created a new layered superconducting material with a conducting layer made of bismuth, silver, tin, sulfur and selenium. The conducting layer features four distinct sublayers; by introducing more elements, they were able to achieve unparalleled customizability and a higher ''critical temperature'' below which superconductivity is observed, a key objective of superconductor research. Their design strategy may be applied to engineer new and improved superconducting materials.

what do you think?

2019-10-12 14:12:26



Another reason to get cataract surgery: It can make you 48% safer on the road  

Researchers in Australia used a driving simulator to test patients' vision before and after cataract surgery. They found that near misses and crashes decreased by 48% after surgery.

what do you think?

2019-10-12 14:12:21



More evidence linking common bladder medication to a vision-threatening eye condition  

A drug widely prescribed for a bladder condition for decades, now appears to be toxic to the retina, the light sensing tissue at the back of the eye that allows us to see.

what do you think?

2019-10-12 14:12:18



Creating 2D heterostructures for future electronics  

New research integrates nanomaterials into heterostructures, an important step toward creating nanoelectronics.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 16:53:32



Hydrologic simulation models that inform policy decisions are difficult to interpret  

Hydrologic models that simulate and predict water flow are used to estimate how natural systems respond to different scenarios such as changes in climate, land use, and soil management. The output from these models can inform policy and regulatory decisions regarding water and land management practices. Numerical models have become increasingly easy to employ with advances in computer technology and software with graphical user interface (GUI). While these technologies make the models more acces

what do you think?

2019-10-11 16:53:30



Brain protein promotes maintenance of chronic pain  

Study results illuminate the potential of novel approach for the treatment of chronic pain.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 16:53:27



Contextual engineering improves success of projects in non-industrial societies  

Humanitarian engineering projects often focus on bringing western technologies to non-industrialized societies. But environmental and cultural factors in these locations may be very different from conditions in the West, and the projects may not meet client needs if engineers do not fully understand the context in which they are operating.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 16:53:24



Black holes stunt growth of dwarf galaxies  

Astronomers have discovered that powerful winds driven by supermassive black holes in the centers of dwarf galaxies have a significant impact on the evolution of these galaxies by suppressing star formation.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 16:53:22



How preprocessing methods affect the conversion efficiency of biomass energy production  

Research on energy production from biomass usually focuses on the amount of energy generated. But it is also important to consider how much energy goes into the process, a component that is often neglected. A study from the University of Illinois takes a look at the bioconversion efficiency of two products often used as biomass for energy production, miscanthus giganteus and sugarcane bagasse.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 16:53:20



New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change  

Researchers use long-term survey data sets and climate models to help fishing communities plan for a warmer ocean. Researchers have developed a tool that incorporates projected changes in ocean climate onto a geographic fishery management area. Now fishermen, resource managers, and policy-makers can use it to plan for the future sustainability of the lobster fishery in Nova Scotia and Canadian waters of the Gulf of Maine.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 15:53:19



Nanoscale manipulation of light leads to exciting new advancement  

Controlling the interactions between light and matter has been a long-standing ambition for scientists seeking to develop and advance numerous technologies that are fundamental to society. With the boom of nanotechnology in recent years, the nanoscale manipulation of light has become both, a promising pathway to continue this advancement, as well as a unique challenge due to new behaviors that appear when the dimensions of structures become comparable to the wavelength of light.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 15:53:10



'Electroadhesive' stamp picks up and puts down microscopic structures  

New technique could enable assembly of circuit boards and displays with more minute components.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 14:46:19



Coffee bean extracts alleviate inflammation, insulin resistance in mouse cells  

Food science and human nutrition researchers are interested in the potential of inflammation-fighting compounds found in the silverskin and husk of coffee beans, not only for their benefits in alleviating chronic disease, but also in adding value to would-be 'waste' products from the coffee processing industry.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 14:46:16



Opioid Rx dosages drop with state law changes  

The total amount of opioids dispensed per new opioid prescription decreased by 22% in Penn Medicine outpatient practices in New Jersey after the state passed a law limiting prescriptions to a five-day supply for new opioid prescriptions. Penn Medicine implemented an electronic health record (EMR) alert, or 'nudge,' to notify clinicians if that limit had been reached.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 14:46:02



New soft actuators could make soft robots less bulky  

Engineers have developed a way to build soft robots that are compact, portable and multifunctional. The advance was made possible by creating soft, tubular actuators whose movements are electrically controlled, making them easy to integrate with small electronic components. As a proof of concept, engineers used the new actuators to build an untethered, battery-powered, walking soft robot and a soft gripper.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 14:20:00



Fast-acting German insecticide lost in the aftermath of WWII  

A new study explores the chemistry as well as the complicated and alarming history of DFDT, a fast-acting insecticide.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 13:19:07



The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds  

Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. Researchers in this study investigated continental-scale breeding season associations with ANP for 322 bird species to test whether local-scale predictions are consistent at broad spatial extents for an extensive group of North American bird species in the continental United States.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 13:19:05



Sox9 reshapes the biliary tree in Alagille syndrome  

Mose model shows that SOX9 gene influences the severity Alagille syndrome.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 13:19:03



Six degrees of nuclear separation  

For the first time, scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 13:19:01



Private property, not productivity, precipitated Neolithic agricultural revolution  

The Neolithic Agricultural Revolution is one of the most thoroughly-studied episodes in prehistory. But a new article shows that most explanations for it don't agree with the evidence, and offers a new interpretation.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 13:18:58



CO2 emissions cause lost labor productivity  

Extreme high temperatures caused by CO2 emissions could lead to losses in labor productivity. The authors found that every trillion tons of CO2 emitted could cause global GDP losses of about half a percent. They add that we may already be seeing economic losses of as much as 2% of global GDP as a result of what we have already emitted.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 13:18:56



Slower walkers have older brains and bodies at 45  

The walking speed of 45-year-olds can be used as a marker of their aging brains and bodies. The evidence was there in neurocognitive testing these individuals took at age 3 to indicate who would become the slower walkers. At 45, slower walkers have 'accelerated aging' on a 19-measure scale devised by researchers, and their lungs, teeth and immune systems tended to be in worse shape than the people who walked faster.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:50



New test diagnoses Lyme disease within 15 minutes  

Current testing for Lyme disease, called the standard 2-tiered approach or the STT, involves running two complex assays (ELISA and western blot) to detect antibodies against the bacterium, and requires experienced personnel in a lab, and a few hours to carry out and interpret. Biomedical engineers have developed a rapid microfluidic test that can detect Lyme disease with similar performance as the STT in a much shorter time -- 15 minutes.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:46



Under time pressure, people tell us what we want to hear  

When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively, people tend to respond with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, a set of experiments shows.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:42



Expert second opinion improves reliability of melanoma diagnoses  

A new study has found that obtaining a second opinion from pathologists who are board certified or have fellowship training in dermatopathology can help improve the accuracy and reliability of diagnosing melanoma.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:40



Family of crop viruses at the molecular level  

For the first-time we can take a molecular-level look at one of the world's deadliest crop killers.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:38



Overweight before age 40 increases the cancer risk  

The risk of cancer increases considerably if you gain weight before the age of 40.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:36



Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: Evidence from brain connectivity evaluation  

The researchers recruited healthy older participants to two groups according to their history of tea drinking frequency and investigated both functional and structural networks to reveal the role of tea drinking on brain organization.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:35



'Cross-transfer' benefits of special exercise technique questioned  

Researchers question the effectiveness of a patented exercise system for relieving lower back pain.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:33



New material captures carbon dioxide and converts it into useful chemicals  

The captured CO2 can be converted into useful organic materials.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:31



Population aging to create pockets of climate vulnerability in the US  

Population aging projections across the US show a divide between cities and rural areas, which could lead to pockets of vulnerability to climate change.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 11:22:29



Overcoming the blood-brain-barrier: Delivering therapeutics to the brain  

For the first time, scientists have identified a simple way that can effectively transport medication into the brain - which could lead to improved treatments for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:33



Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed  

Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow researchers to study biological processes below the classical diffraction limit of light. Researchers have now developed DNA-PAINT, a variant of these so-called super-resolution approaches.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:31



Illumination of abnormal neuronal activities caused by myelin impairment  

The neural circuit basis for motor learning tasks when myelination is impaired has been illuminated for the first time. Researchers also succeeded in compensating for the impaired motor learning process by pairing appropriate actions with brain photo-simulation to promote synchronization of neuronal activities. This could contribute to future treatments for neurological and psychiatric diseases in which white matter function is impaired.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:29



Liquid metals the secret ingredients to clean up environment  

Liquid metal catalysts show great promise for capturing carbon and cleaning up pollutants, requiring so little energy they can even be created in the kitchen.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:27



Physics: An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere  

Researchers have explored the initial consequences of the interaction of light with molecules on the surface of nanoscopic aerosols.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:25



Cold temperatures linked to high status  

Researchers have discovered that people associate cold temperatures with luxury items, which is important for companies that are trying to promote products that convey high status.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:23



Powerful new genomics method can be used to reveal the causes of rare genetic diseases  

The technique makes use of the fact that people inherit two copies or ''alleles'' of virtually every gene, one from the mother and one from the father. The new method compares activity levels of maternal and paternal alleles across the genome and detects when the activity of an allele lies far enough outside the normal range to be a plausible cause of disease.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:21



Rare sleep disorder common among veterans with PTSD  

Military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder or concussion suffer from a thrashing form of sleep behavior at a rate that is far higher than the general population, according to a new study. Researchers next want to probe whether the sleep disorder might provide an early signal of the development of neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:19



Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change  

Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:17



Chronobiology: Sleep and synaptic rhythms  

Chronobiologists show how critical the sleep-wake cycle is for protein and phosphorylation dynamics in synapses to ultimately regulate its activity.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:15



Type 2 diabetes and obesity could be treated by new, less invasive procedure  

New research has found that a newly tested medical device, called Sleeveballoon, mimics the effects of traditional bariatric surgery in rodents and produces impressive results on body weight, fatty liver and diabetes control.

what do you think?

2019-10-11 09:59:13






Top Activity Today

register to participate
xpfree
morseabstracts.com
logitech
yoursearch.in/
ultimatetechnews
ultimate-tech-news.com
merujhaspell
merujhaspell.webs.com
EMR_Records
1bestofone.blogspot.com/2013/0...
mjamalu
brilliantkeepsakes.etsy.com
Santiago
desalepandora.de/
larrysm012
yourpcmate.com
5096702071
zazzle.com/bibleverseproducts
erub3n
sites.google.com/site/jollyboy...


Activity Feed

anonymous  liked the article 'Machine Madness by Darrell Flood' in web development

anonymous  liked the article 'Easy DIY Jewelry Stand' in crafts


anonymous  liked the article 'Gorillaz Drummer Russel Hobbs: 5 Songs I Love' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Expandable Heart Valves Could Mean Fewer Surgeries ' in health

anonymous  liked the article 'Worth Market Trends for April 2018' in real estate

anonymous  liked the article 'U.S. Workers Unload First of Hanjin Ships Stalled By Bankrup...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Fortnite overtime challenges and how to find the dance club ...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'Tramontina All-in-One Pan, Heavy Gauge Cast Aluminum - $24.9...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Summit Market Trends for April 2018' in real estate

anonymous  liked the article 'Machine Madness by Darrell Flood' in web development

anonymous  liked the article 'Bloomberg Business' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Refurb Garmin DriveSmart 50 LMT 5" GPS w/ Lifetime Maps & Tr...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Is Black Friday Shopping Still Worth It? We Asked the Expert...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Hang Time Podcast: Wade beats Warriors + Celtics continue to...' in basketball

anonymous  liked the article 'Amazon - Cuisinart Stainless 4-Piece 12-Quart Pasta/Steamer ...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article '2020 Honda Accord First Review' in vehicles

anonymous  liked the article '2019 Kia Optima vs. 2019 Acura TLX Comparison' in vehicles

anonymous  liked the article 'Amir Khan crushes Waqar Uma with standing elbow KO at ONE FC...' in mma

anonymous  liked the article 'Lenovo® IdeaPad S340 Laptop, 15.6" Screen, AMD Ryzen 5, 8GB...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Eyes Up Here!  Five Times Ariel Winter Took Cleavage To Ano...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'Mets To Select Chris Mazza, Designate Ryan O’Rourke' in baseball

anonymous  liked the article 'Apple releases iOS 11.2.5 beta 5 update' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'Here’s Everything You Need to Know About the Fascinating H...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Dromaeosaurus raptor posable art doll' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Roman Atwood To Host $100,000 Giveaway In Biggest-Ever Editi...' in vids

anonymous  liked the article 'Elaine's townhouse from 'Seinfeld' is on sale for $8.65 mill...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Carpenter continues I-70 success in KC' in baseball

anonymous  liked the article 'PS4 WB Games Digital Sale: Batman Return to Arkham $8, Mad M...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article '(212): you should probably call...' in humor

anonymous  liked the article 'The Drink of the Gods: An Introduction to Pulque' in food

anonymous  liked the article 'The Death and Life of America’s Lesbian Bars' in food

anonymous  liked the article 'Facebook fascism and the slippery slope to tyranny...' in religion

anonymous  liked the article 'Quinoa & Berries Smoothie Bowl' in food

anonymous  liked the article 'Faria vs. Borella added to UFC 216 card' in mma

anonymous  liked the article 'What is the best down payment?' in vehicles

anonymous  liked the article 'Manchester United vs. Manchester City Hot Tip 24 April ' in gambling

anonymous  liked the article 'Kyle Korver attends funeral for younger brother' in basketball

anonymous  liked the article '2018 Kia Rio EX 5-Door First Review' in vehicles

anonymous  liked the article 'Lenovo IdeaPad 330 Laptop: AMD Ryzen 5 2500U, 15.6" 1080p, 2...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Netflix’s You Season 2 Adds Chris D’Elia in Recurring Ro...' in movies

anonymous  liked the article 'Michelin Announces 2019 Stars for Budapest, Vienna, Zagreb, ...' in food

anonymous  liked the article 'Ranking every Super Bowl halftime show since Michael Jackson...' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'Protocells, Bombardment, Martian Erosion and Biofluorescence' in science

anonymous  liked the article 'Super Mario 64! Whoo-hoo!' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Dont starve pinata' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Anri Sugihara - sensual white lingerie 6' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'JCPenney Super Saturday Sale: Extra 20% to 25% off + free sh...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article '[CM] Massive Miyake (Animation)' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Bus-sharing app Shuttl gets $11M Series B from investors inc...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'Android 7.1.2 adds 'Swipe for notifications' featu...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article '6 Ways Having An Son With Autism Made My Life BETTER' in family

anonymous  liked the article 'Why We Listen to Buffett' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Sabrent 4-Port USB 3.0 Hub w/ Individual Power Switches and ...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Get Ready for Foldable Smartphones, Because They’re About ...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Pre-Order Rime on PS4 and Get a Dynamic Theme' in video games

anonymous  liked the article 'Why Scientists Tried to Measure All of the Starlight That Ev...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'The Insane Way Super Troopers 2 Had To Be Filmed' in movies

anonymous  liked the article '2018 Week 12 College Football Betting Guide' in gambling

anonymous  liked the article ' News | ATP Tour | Tennis ' in tennis

anonymous  liked the article 'BestMassage 10x30ft Gazebo Party Tent w/ 8 Sidewalls for $72...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article ''I Got You,' Said Shooting Victim Who Died Shielding Survivo...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'The 10 windiest cities in the US' in green

anonymous  liked the article 'Trump signs order pushing work for welfare benefits' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Walmart - Swiffer Continuous Clean $49.95' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Re: One Tiny Easter/Spring Thing SU 3/16 to 3/27, SO 4/10' in crafts

anonymous  liked the article 'Bridget Marquardt Finally Speaks Out on Holly Madison and Ke...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article '‘Leaving Neverland’ director explains why he didn’t in...' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Sen. Orrin Hatch: Tolerance Has Become Intolerant. But There...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'With loss of Yahoo and image search, Google Shopping search ...' in web marketing

anonymous  liked the article '4.92 Acres Of Agricultural Land in Los Angeles County, Calif...' in real estate

anonymous  liked the article 'It is time to hunker in the bunker? Or to think about resili...' in green

anonymous  liked the article 'Study Says That Men Have The Better Sense Of Direction' in health

anonymous  liked the article 'New Sniper Ghost Warrior 3 Update Reduces Loading Times, Fix...' in video games

anonymous  liked the article 'Dear White People Creator Justin Simien on ‘Navigating Oth...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Hotness like this always wins (32 Photos)' in humor

anonymous  liked the article 'T-Boz Shares First Photo Of Her Adopted Son, Chance' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Wendy Wonka, Fatty Maddie, and the E-claire' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Ahri of egypt' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Knuckles and Master Emerald render' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Dream.In.Code Logo' in web development

anonymous  liked the article 'BASES - Reupload' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'nyanyel's high standards' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'TG Tactical Pen for free + $6 s&h' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Ray-Ban Women's Erika Sunglasses for $60 w/...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Nuvo Cabinet Makeover Paint Kit for $37 + free shipping' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Vigilando Extimus [TheShift]' in art

anonymous  liked the article '12-Month Xbox Live Gold Membership for $40' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Star Coral, Crystal Coral, Brittle Coral, Starburst Coral' in animals

anonymous  liked the article 'Pineapple-Themed Home Goods' in home

anonymous  liked the article 'Photoshop Redo: Reviving a Faded Victorian' in home

anonymous  liked the article 'How to Repair a Broken Doorbell' in home

anonymous  liked the article 'Anderson on mission after challenging 2017' in baseball

anonymous  liked the article 'Weidman has his sights set on multiple belts, but it all sta...' in mma

anonymous  liked the article 'A Note to the Nobel Prize Selection Committee' in science

anonymous  liked the article 'Giuliani tells CNN he's unaware he's under investigation for...' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Behind-The-Scenes: Nick Offerman Visits Ask TOH' in home

anonymous  liked the article 'What Is It? | Black Plastic Handles' in home

anonymous  liked the article 'Causes of vitiligo (blotchy loss of skin color)' in science

anonymous  liked the article 'Perrie Edwards Has More Stories About Zayn Malik That Are To...' in entertainment
All Rights Reserved.   Terms Of Use   Contact Us